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Who do you trust ?

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Who do you trust ? It was lying there, the battered and torn body. There was a moment of silence as detective David Whittle and I stared at the body. I could not understand how this had occurred. It had been a fairly quiet day at the station until I had received a phone call from a distressed mother, pleading for us to help. Her voice was hard to understand as she was crying so hard. I traced the call to a small village just on the edge of Brighton, called Linden where a Miss Hutton lived. I had visited Linden before as one of my old friends lived there. It was a quiet little town, which had nothing special about it. It was not far by car but I was confused as to why we were going there, as the screaming woman had not explained anything to us. We arrived at the scene within fifteen minutes, still very confused. The house was old, with dark red bricks and it stood distinctively at the end of the road. ...read more.


We examined them and David, being a vehicle expert recognised that they had been left by a transit van. The name Gary popped into mind when he said transit van as he had been known to speed around the local village, and I have arrested him on many occasions. He was a short black haired chubby man who had a distinctive scar down the left side of his face. He always wore jeans that were ripped at the bottom, and he had small brown boots. He was in his middle thirties and was not married. David and I sat in our car and decided to ring the police station and tell them to look for the name Gary Myers in the police record books. Surely enough when they looked they said that he has been in and out of the local police station on suspicion of illegal drug-dealing but has never been proven guilty. We went back inside where we found the woman in bed crying. "Now Miss Hutton, did your daughter have any connection with a man named Gary aged around his middle thirties". ...read more.


When he returned he found a kilogram of cannabis had been left out. He thought that if she told anyone about it, then he would be locked up for the illegal dealing and use of drugs. The only way to prevent this from happening was to remove the evidence, by destroying the cannabis and killing Victoria. He killed her using a bowling pin, which would explain the loud crashing sound from upstairs. They also found the bloodstained bowling pin in the back of his van. However, in the end he was locked up not for just a few years, but for life. When I saw Miss Hutton she was devastated, she couldn't believe that this had happened. She was upset that a crazy drug addict had ended her daughter's life that she had always been nice and trusting to. David and I were pleased that we had solved this case so very quickly. But we couldn't help not to be sad for Miss Hutton who lost her only daughter. We stayed in touch with Miss Hutton and she decided after a few months to go and live with her mother in Dorset and we heard nothing from her again after that. ...read more.

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