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Who is the realmonster in Frankenstein?

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Introduction

Who is the real monster in Frankenstein? Frankenstein is a classic horror novel, but with a twist of many other genres. Written by Mary Shelley, it was a novel which mixed many exciting elements, such as horror, drama and romance. The story follows a young doctor named Victor Frankenstein, who has an obsession to reincarnate the dead, but his attempts at this fail horribly, and Victor finds himself in deep peril, as the monster stalks him throughout the world. I aim to investigate the issue, however, of who is the true monster in Frankenstein. The monster or Frankenstein himself? Mary Shelley, the creator of Frankenstein, was a highly intellectual and creative woman, one of the elite writers in Britain. Her inspiration for Frankenstein was taken from several things. The plan itself for Frankenstein was taken from a dream, but her theories of life and explanation of the human anatomy came from noted scientists, philosophers and alchemists from Europe. This spawned the seed of the monster of Frankenstein, an intellectual creature, a lover of music, poetry and other such sophisticated occupancies. The basis of the whole story in itself, however, is a result of a visit to the country and place where the actual book was based in itself. ...read more.

Middle

As a direct result of this neglect, Frankenstein's avoidance of responsibility is becoming more and more apparent, and the realization that Frankenstein himself is the true monster begins to come to light, despite his intelligence, charm and brilliance. The monster's misfortune becomes even more apparent later in his tale. After having learnt how to feed himself, the monster comes upon a small family, living in an isolated farmstead in the woods. He sets up a home of sorts in an animal pen adjacent to the house, and begins the steady process of watching the family, learning their language, their mannerisms, and how they lived in general. The monster thought of the family as friends, and loved them. He performed menial tasks, which made the live of the family easier to live, for example, the chopping of wood and harvesting of food. This shows that the monster is not incapable of love, of goodwill and kind feelings to other human beings. The monster hopes that one day he will be able to live with the family, and they might possibly display the basics of friendship towards him, as he has to them. However, when he comes to the family, and finally reveals his presence, he is berated and beaten, and drove off the farmstead. ...read more.

Conclusion

When looking at the question who is the monster, the finger would be first to point at the monster itself. This, I feel personally is not true. Frankenstein is the true monster. He regarded the monster with less than basic human emotions; he spurned it, and hoped never to see it again. This is an extremely irresponsible decision. It is evident that Frankenstein did not realize that, even though his "specimen" was defective on the outside, it was still a living, breathing, thinking being. A being which needed love, care and tutoring. In his misguided and blind attempts to cheat death, Frankenstein has in fact brought death on others, which is a despicable act. Some may argue that Frankenstein had no choice, but I believe that is inaccurate. He had a choice. He could have stayed, tutored the monster, and tutor it as an equal, in matters of logic and science, and given it as normal a life as it could have. Or, he could have chosen the path that he did, that path Mary Shelley laid out for this book, one which inevitably led to pain and chaos. Matthew Yemm D10B English CW ...read more.

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