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Who is to blame for the killing of King Duncan? Macbeth or Lady Macbeth?

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Introduction

Who is to blame for the killing of King Duncan? Macbeth or Lady Macbeth? It is not easy to blame only one character for the death of King Duncan as there are several people who all play a part in the killing of Duncan. At the beginning of the play in Act 1, scene 2, Macbeth is introduced as a highly esteemed character. 'For brave Macbeth - well he deserves that name ...' The Seargants words at the beginning of the play portray Macbeth's desire to do anything for his King and country by saying 'Disdaining fortune, with hid brandish'd steel ...', 'Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chap, and fix'd his head upon our battlements'. The audience are instantly aware that he is ready and willing to defend his country and that his loyalty to his King is steadfast. ...read more.

Middle

Her evil ambition is clear to the audience as she questions Macbeth's masculinity and proves that she is intent on evil actions. Another way in which Lady Macbeth has a part to play in the killing of King Duncan is by saying 'Have plucked my nipple from his boneless gums, and dashed the brains out, had I sworn as you have done to this.' The desire to kill Duncan is apparent to the audience as she is willing to kill her own baby which is metaphoric to what she wants Macbeth to do. This demonstrates the lengths that she is willing to go through to achieve her ambition of becoming the King's wife. Nevertheless, we should not forget that Macbeth has a big role to play for the killing of King Duncan because he was the person who stabbed him. ...read more.

Conclusion

'My hands are of your colour; but I shame to wear a heart so white.' This gives the impression to the audience that even though Lady Macbeth feels shame and guilt like Macbeth does, she also feels shamed that she is feeling these emotions. Therefore, the audience seems to gather the concept that Lady Macbeth will never truly feel guilt about what she and Macbeth have done. In conclusion, I believe that there is never going to be a single answer on whether Macbeth or Lady Macbeth is to blame for the killing of King Duncan as I believe that all the characters throughout the play have each got their own part to play in the killing of King Duncan. ?? ?? ?? ?? Lydia Giblin, Macbeth Essay ...read more.

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