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Whose life is it Anyway Extra Scene

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Introduction

"Whose life is anyway?" is a play written by Brian Clark is about Ken Harrison who after a road accident is paralyzed from the neck down. After six months his condition is more stable but he feels he isn't treated properly by the staff at the hospital. As the doctors battle to save him, he battles to die. Euthanasia is the deliberate killing of a person for the benefit of that person. It is legal in countries like Belgium, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland, the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. It is illegal in Britain because it is the same as committing and it is also classed as a criminal act. This is the theme of the play. Diane Pretty was a mother who was terminally ill with motor neuron and was expected to die soon. She wanted her husband to 'help her die'. She wrote to the director of Public Prosecution so that her husband wouldn't be prosecuted also she wrote to Tony Blair the P.M at the time, these were rejected. She took her case to the European Court of Human Rights, House of Lords and the European Court of Human Rights. ...read more.

Middle

Hill who after meeting Dr.Emerson agrees seeing how "...Mr. Harrison needs a solicitor" helps Ken. Nurse Sadler, who represents a more informal personal aspect of the hospital. Dr.Emerson is against Ken's wish to die "It is my duty as a Doctor to preserve life" he believes against euthanasia so strongly that he uses the Mental Health act. Sister Anderson who being old school doesn't agree with Ken "I won't wish you good luck". Dr Travers, the doctor who signs for the mental health act also agrees with Dr.Emerson. The characters are used to give both sides of the argument. I think the argument is imbalanced as Ken has many permanent supporters unlike Dr.Emerson who only has Dr.Travers. Brian Clark shows the two sides of Euthanasia through arguments for example: when Dr.Scott talks to Dr.Emerson she says its "... his life" and Dr.Emerson responds by saying that "it is my duty as a doctor to preserve life". Dr.Travers conversation with Ken and also the hearing at the end. The main point of Brian Clark's argument is that patients should be given more control to what happens to them when they are in hospital. Brian Clark articulates this to the staff through Ken's comments to the hospital staff. ...read more.

Conclusion

Brian Clark wanted to get the audience to think of them as two rivals equally matched. Ken being the underdog comes to claim victory in the end of the play. The hospitals of the 1970's were very professional as they didn't get very personal with patients. Also they didn't take the patients decision as they considered themselves right. The audience will be thinking about what would they have done if they were in Ken's situation and whether euthanasia should be legal or not. The audience would sympathize with Ken because he is the one that is not going to be able to use his body for the rest of his life and stay in a hospital. They might also sympathize a little for Dr.Emerson who worked hard to save Ken's life and in the end it was all for nothing. To conclude the argument of both sides was whether to let Ken die or not. The view we get of the medical profession is that sometimes they are sympathetic and sometimes they are brutal. ?? ?? ?? ?? "Whose life is it anyway?" by Brian Clark is about Ken Harrison's determination decide his own fate, and about the determination of others keep him alive. What are the arguments of both sides? What view does the play give of the medical professional? Zain Tahir ...read more.

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