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Why do you think that 'The Crucible' is frequently produced?

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Introduction

Why do you think that 'The Crucible' is frequently produced? Based on the witch-hunts of the Seventeenth Century, Arthur Miller's 'The Crucible' written in 1953, deals with various key themes such as witchcraft and religion which link together and play a major role in the events of the town of Salem. Hysteria breaks out when a group of girls are caught dancing in the woods. When faced with the accusation of witchcraft, the girls use lies to back up their denial and in turn pass the blame onto other members of the community. The date in which it was written is highly significant. It is the year that America was in the grip of a modern day "witch-hunt' - 'McCarthyism'. I will discuss the continuing popularity of the play and the reasons for its frequent production, focusing on the idea of political propaganda and other factors that account for the story's continued interest. The powerful and moving plot of 'The Crucible' is one of the foremost reasons much interest is drawn to the play. There are many emotional and tense scenes that grip the reader or audience's attention. An example of this is the scene in which Elizabeth is called in to tell the courts whether or not Proctor, her husband, had an affair. ...read more.

Middle

Abigail's sudden change of personality draws the audience or reader's attention closer and as her altered character emerges the audience is captivated. The script of 'The Crucible' is very well written and each scene has an absorbing atmosphere due to the actions and words of each character. The way it has been written grips the reader right until the end making it an excellent play to be produced, partly explaining why it is so frequently produced. Although 'The Crucible' was based on the Salem witch-hunts, the play was written with another purpose. During the era in which the play was written, American Senator Joseph McCarthy accused hundreds of his fellow countrymen of betraying their country through having communist sympathies, and encouraged them to accuse each other. He never produced a single shred of evidence, yet millions of Americans believed he was a crusader, fighting to make America safe for democracy. Miller uses his play to highlight the absurdity of the accusations in 1950s America, in which he was involved, through the theme of seventeenth century witch hunts. Those accused were ostracized, and in some cases, imprisoned. Many were left jobless and found many turning against them - all because of an unjust accusation. After studying the plot, it is clear to see the relationship between the hysteria in America and that of 'The Crucible'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The play could be interpreted as a warning to the modern world, a caution and reminder. It is a lesson to be learnt from history, and help us to understand what could potentially happen to victimised groups in our world today. It is a method of subconsciously informing many people, and this is why it may be seen as important to produce the play frequently. Arthur Miller's 'The Crucible' is an exceptionally well-written play that has constantly attracted audiences since it was first written in 1953. However its excellent script that uses key timeless themes and is one that many can relate to is not just the reason for its frequent production. Events in history need to be used as key reminders of what can happen in the future, and 'The Crucible' addresses these issues well. However, I think the most important and perhaps main reason it has been such a popular play is the on-goings in America at the time it was written. Not only does it remind us of events from the past but also informs us about McCarthyism from a targeted person's point of view. The message 'The Crucible' gives is interpreted differently for each person, but there is one thing it has in common; the reader or audience will never forget it. It is a play that is frequently produced, and needs to be for the sake of the future. ...read more.

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