• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why do you think William Golding chose to set 'Lord of the Flies" on and island in the novel and how does he use it?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Why do you think William Golding chose to set ?Lord of the Flies? on an island in the novel and how does he use it? William Golding chose to set ?Lord of the Flies? on an island because it creates a theme of isolation, and makes any hope of rescue almost void. He uses the idea of an island as a blank canvas backdrop in several ways that enhance the effectiveness of the story. One of the first descriptions of the place where the boys are is that of a scar, ?The undergrowth at the side of the scar was shaken?. This introduces the idea that mankind has been responsible for damaging a seemingly idyllic landscape. It is mankind who brings the negative changes to the scenery such as ?the long scar smashed into the jungle?, ?all them tree trunks falling? and ?coarse grass, torn everywhere?. The use of onomatopoeia in ?smashed? gives the reader a very early precursor of violence. ...read more.

Middle

The transformation of the fire foreshadows the death of the boy with mulberry shaped birthmark. Another example is the storm that begins to build before and during Simon?s demise, ?Over the island the build-up of clouds continued?. Golding describes ?revolving masses of gas piled up static until the air was ready to explode?, the use of the verb ?explode? implies that a climactic event is imminent. The phrase ?build-up? is also a reference to the rising tension between Jack and Ralph, hinting that it will soon come to a head. In the course of Simon?s death ?the clouds opened and let down the rain like a waterfall?, it is almost as if nature weeps at the loss of Golding?s saint. William Golding chose to set ?Lord of the Flies? on an island so he could create an isolated geographical microcosm where nature parallels human endeavours. The island reflects the split human psyche, having a ?good? side and a ?bad? side. ...read more.

Conclusion

Extending the biblical allegory, Golding makes the comparison of the lagoon vs. castle rock to ?Heaven vs. hell?. William Golding chose to set ?Lord of the Flies? on an island in the novel because he wanted to create a setting that would enable him to show the different sides of human nature. In conclusion Golding chose to set ?Lord of the Flies? on and island so that he could isolate not just his protagonists but nature itself, which could be manipulated to reflect the events in the novel. He uses it as a biblical allusion to the ?Garden of Eden? and the temptation that leads to the fall of man. Nature is used to parallel the complexities in the plot. Golding also separates the island into to two halves, the ?good? side and the ?bad? side to mirror human psyche. Lastly the irony of a ?boat-shaped? island is not lost on the reader with a boat being the one thing they want and need but cannot get. By Isha Shukla ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. Free essay

    Why Do You Think William Golding Chose To Set Lord of the Flies on ...

    4 star(s)

    Golding used the island to show how heaven and hell, and likewise good and evil are closely linked and should not be overlooked. Another metaphor was the fire represented nuclear war, and the destruction and devastation to innocent people. Golding set Lord of the Flies on an island with water

  2. Why Do You Think Golding Chose To Set " Lord Of The Flies" On ...

    Also, by being set on an island, Golding has an opportunity to introduce the conch. The conch represents democracy and order.

  1. How does William Golding use language in his description of the island and the ...

    He leaps onto the sand commanding the others "Do our dance! Come on! Dance!". The boys follow and Jack can claim victory over Ralph for leadership. Now the lightning is "flashing", Golding has made it bigger and more frequent, making the intensity of the atmosphere escalate further.

  2. Compare how the authors present and use the concept of the island setting in ...

    The boys however seem to share no thought for anyone but themselves and their fun. They don't, at this early stage worry about the consequences of being on a desert island. Soon after Crusoe and the boys arrive on the islands they both are described as stripping.

  1. The presentation of the island itselfI think that William Golding chose to strand the ...

    now become their 'enemies'. With a situatuation like this nothing gets kept under control and that's when people get hurt.

  2. Our Country's Good, Plot and Subplot

    This shows the audience how she's not very bright, and how she's had a very rough upbringing. She then tells Wisehammer to speak in English when he uses big words. This is humorous for the audience, as her monologue was full of words and phrases the audience don't understand.

  1. There he was, in his beloved chair again, watching an all too familiar war ...

    You have everything you could possibly want. I mean if you were to leave what would you do. You have no job, money, or any friends. Society has reached a stage where it does not want honest people like you. I mean come on, you did have a good job as an accountant and look back to how you got sacked.

  2. Lord of the Flies Essay How does Golding build up to the final ...

    and the immediate conclusions drawn, are that the boys will be able to function correctly. However, in order to convey his deep concerns regarding human nature and the capacity for evil, Golding creates images very early on in the book, that suggest the island is not quite the paradise that we initially perceived it to be.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work