• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why is Act 3 Scene 1 such an important turning point in the play 'Romeo and Juliet'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why is Act 3 Scene 1 such an important turning point in the play 'Romeo and Juliet'? 'Romeo and Juliet' was first published in 1597 and written by William Shakespeare when Elizabeth 1 was on the throne. At the time when it was published women's parts were played by young boys between the ages of ten and thirteen because girls and women were not allowed to act on stage. 'Romeo and Juliet' may have been a romance if it were not for the events of Act 3 Scene 1. Romeo is from the Montague family and Juliet is fro, the Capulet family, both the families hate each other due to an 'ancient grudge'. When Romeo goes to a party hosted by The Capulets, he gets spotted by Tybalt (Juliet's cousin) who wants to fight but is held back by Lord Capulet. After Romeo and Juliet get married, Tybalt goes looking for Romeo but Romeo doesn't want to fight. Mercutio (Romeo's best friend) fights for him and is killed. Romeo, as a result kills Tybalt. Romeo's punishment was only banishment because Tybalt started the fight. The banishment of Romeo causes himself, Juliet, Paris and Lady Montague to die. Act 3 Scene 1 is important because the play could have been a romance but turned into a tragedy however, it also causes the feud between the families to end as a result of their children's deaths. ...read more.

Middle

There is a build up of tension before Romeo appears as Tybalt and Mercutio are acting strangely and Benvolio has already suggested there could be trouble. When Romeo enters the scene he is challenged by Tybalt and refuses to fight him because he has just married his cousin, Juliet, and is now related to him. He tries to calm Tybalt down by saying "I do protest I never injured thee, but love thee better than thou canst devise." The reason Mercutio fights is because he feels that Romeo not fighting is a slur on the Montague name. "O calm, dishonorable, vile submission." The fight could have been avoided because they could have walked away; Perhaps Romeo shouldn't have gone to the party. Possibly Mercutio should have taken Benvolio's advice and left or Romeo could have told Tybalt the truth about his marriage. In the two filmed versions of the fight they show the situation differently. In Zeffirelli's version the setting is in Old Verona and the characters are traditional but contemporary for the time. They only play music, when Romeo goes after Tybalt and the atmosphere is mainly filled with laughter and the fight seems like a joke. The weapons used are the traditional swords and the weather is sunny as it adds to better atmosphere. Tybalt's death in Zeffirelli's version is more accidental as he falls on Romeo's sword and Mercutio's death by the sword was seen as a joke, Tybalt didn't even know about Mercutio's death until Romeo chased him. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Come, cordial, and not poison, go with me to Juliet's grave, for there must I use thee." Lady Montague's death could have been avoided because she died because she was upset at Romeo's banishment, so if he didn't get banished she would still be alive. Romeo's and Juliet's deaths could have been avoided if Friar Lawrence's plan had gone well. Tibet and Mercado's link back to Act 3 Scene 1 because they had the fight and Tibet killed Mercuric and Romeo killed Tibet out of pure revenge. Paris' death links back to Act 3 Scene 1 because if it was not for Romeo's banishment then Romeo wouldn't be there in the first place. Lady Montague's death links back to Act 3 Scene 1 because if Romeo wasn't banished she wouldn't have been upset and died. Romeo's death links back to Act 3 Scene 1 because if he wasn't banished then Juliet wouldn't have taken the potion and he wouldn't have thought she was dead in result to killing himself. Juliet's death links back to Act 3 Scene 1 because she wouldn't have taken the potion and Romeo wouldn't have killed himself so she wouldn't have killed herself with his dagger. "Oh happy dagger, this is my sheath." So in all the consequence of the tragedy were Tybalt, Mercutio, Paris, Lady Montague, Romeo and Juliet dying. There was, however, some good out of the tragedy because it ended the 'ancient grudge'. At the end the Prince says "For never was story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo." The rhyming couplet brings the play to a close. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Why is Act 3 Scene 1 such an important part of Shakespeare's tragedy, "Romeo ...

    "Mercutio: Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch; marry, 'tis enough. Where is my page? Go, villain, fetch a surgeon." Mercutio is acting like his usual self, even when he realises that the wound is actually more than a scratch he continues to joke.

  2. Why is Act 3, Scene 1 a turning point in Romeo and Juliet?

    Romeo and Tybalt fight with words in Act 3, Scene 1 as Tybalt and Romeo argue in uneven 11 syllables Romeo then performs a classic caesura to get one better than him. The context of the speech and language is meaningful, and the way in which the line is read

  1. Explore Shakespeares Presentation of Act 3 Scene 1 as a Turning Point in the ...

    I hate the word". The word hate here is part of one the play's key themes of love versus hate. Tybalt's opening words to Romeo contrast greatly to his opening words to Mercutio, he says "Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford no better term than this: thou art a villain".

  2. Comparing two versions of Romeo & Juliet (Zefferelli and Baz Luhram).

    If the Friar had not suggested his dramatic plan to the desperate Juliet, she may never have seen Romeo again and the couple would have stayed alive, albeit in depression! Perhaps, however, that if Juliet had not had the chance to see Romeo again she would have committed suicide anyway.

  1. Explore the dramatic effect of Act 3 Scene 1 in Romeo and Juliet. In ...

    ball, has angered him, subsequently Tybalt wants to fight: "Turn and draw!" Moreover Benvolio tells Mercutio and Tybalt not to fight in public, the effect that this has on the audience is one of trusting Benvolio as they realize something bad will be a result of the fight if it does take place.

  2. didn't think I would ever fall in love, come to think of it I ...

    Lucian and my grandfather is Nigerian. I walked in she turned around and smiled at me. 'Looks like my baby's got an apatite today, dinner is nearly finished' I smiled at her. 'Baby set the plates please' I did as I was told.

  1. Oppositions and Contrasts are Strikingly Common in Romeo and Juliet. Illustrate and Comment upon ...

    his life will be devoted to his enemy because he has fallen in love with one of them. Juliet's reaction is similar; 'my only love sprung from my only hate'. Her use of opposing words in this statement 'love' and 'hate' reinforce in the audience's minds the strength of this opposition in the play.

  2. In what way is Act 3 Scene 1 a turning point in the play ...

    Romeo is the son of Montague. He is a peace lover; he doesn't like to join in street fights e.g. the opening scene. He disapproves of fighting. He doesn't respond to Tybalt's provocation, it is ironic because he feels related to Tybalt, as he has just married Juliet).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work