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Why is Act 3 Scene 3 a Turning point in the play Othello by William Shakespeare?

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Introduction

Why is Act 3 Scene 3 a Turning point in the play Othello by William Shakespeare? Shakespeare wrote 'Othello' in 1602. During Elizabethan times there were very few black people in England. The white people felt scared about the black people because they didn't understand them. The play explores racism and mixed race relationships. Shakespeare apparently felt free to handle Giraldi's story with perfect freedom. He transformed a straggling narrative of sordid crime into compact drama and high tragedy. The masterly first act is essentially Shakespeare's invention. In this act, Othello, who has eloped with Desdemona, is accused of stealing her. Blinded by prejudice, Desdemona's father cannot believe his daughter can love the Moor, a man of a different race. But Othello movingly defends his love and demonstrates the nobility of his character. Iago is the treacherous comrade. Angered that Cassio has been appointed Othello's lieutenant, a post Iago wanted, Iago plots his revenge. He warns Othello that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona. Brilliantly manipulating Othello's jealousy and rising anger, Iago has his wife Emilia, who is Desdemona's serving maid, steal a handkerchief that Othello gave his bride at their wedding. Iago plants the handkerchief on Cassio. Convinced of Desdemona's infidelity, Othello smothers his beloved wife in their marriage bed. ...read more.

Middle

But the main characteristics that are essential to the play is that Othello is somebody who believes what people tell him and can easily be influenced. This is shown in the words used by Iago while describing Othello, "The moor is of a free and open nature". In order to ruin Othello and Casso, Iago creates a plan which would show Desdemona as having an affair with Cassio. In order to carry out this plan, Iago pursues his plan to continue seeming to be Othello's friend and honest adviser. First we can see Iagos plan from the following words: "I'll pour this pestilence into his eat". "So will I turn her virtue into pitch". Iago presents him self as an honest adviser to Othello while carrying out his plan. "Well my good lord I'll do't" Once Iago has Won Othello's confidence, he seems to be able to manipulate Othello's feelings by creating feelings of jealousy with comments like "Ha! I like not that", and also words like "Cassio my lord?" making it seem like there is something wrong with Cassio being with Desdemona. During the play we can also see that words like "No further harm", "Nothing, my lord", "Honest, my lord?" are being employed by Iago to reasure Othello that Iago is by his side, while appearing to try to minimize something bad. ...read more.

Conclusion

Come go with me apart, I will withdraw To furnish me with some swift means of death" This changes the way the audience perceive Othello from Othello saying life would be chaos if Desdemona wasn't there at the beginning of the scene to damn her, get her away from me and kill her at the end. This really starts the tragedy with the audience now knowing that evil Iago's plan has worked and the play will have a tragic ending, This builds up the tension as well, because the characters in the play still refer to Iago as "honest" when the audience can see plainly he is not. Shakespeare uses certain ironies in the play, where he seems to be saying something to a person, but in fact is saying something completely different and evil. An example of this is in Act III, Scene III, where Othello says to Iago, 'I am bound to thee forever.' When Othello says this, he means how he is indebted to Iago, but the hidden, ironic meaning is that Othello is now the property of Iago, and will not escape his evil grip until death. These sorts of ironies again bring out the idea of the villains talking in a riddle, which gets passed on to Othello. This whole idea I think is showing how evil is so powerful that once it has you, there is no escape. ?? ?? ?? ?? Adnan Maqsood Southfields Community College Centre No: 11062 ...read more.

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