• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why is chapter 39 of Great Expectations a key chapter and how does Dickens convey its importance and drama to the reader?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why is chapter 39 of Great Expectations a key chapter and how does Dickens convey its importance and drama to the reader? Rahman Khan 10C Chapter 39 is a pivotal chapter in the novel because Pip finally finds out who his benefactor is and how his feelings are portrayed through the language Dickens used. I will also explain in this essay how Dickens has conveyed to the reader. In the beginning of the chapter the reader is reminded of the age Pip is 'I was three and twenty years of age.' This is reminding the reader that many years had passed and that Pip had nothing to 'enlighten' him on his expectations. He has also left 'Barnard's Inn more than a year, and lived in temple'. He hasn't seen Mr. Pocket for some time now, which is curious because they were the best of friends. Pip is 'alone' and he was 'dispirited and anxious' this may be because he still doesn't know who is benefactor is that ...read more.

Middle

Who comes out of nowhere and knows Pip? This creates more tension within the chapter on how the weather, Pip's feelings and his emotions are in contrasts with his fear, and now, a stranger has come to see Pip. Dickens makes Pip is reluctant to invite the man into his home because of the question the stranger asks 'There's no one nigh...is there?' which is created more drama and suspense in this chapter because it makes the reader wonder why would he want to know who is up there instead of Pip? The greatest surprise is when we finally find out who this stranger is...he is Magwitch, the convict who Pip helped long ago. Magwitch makes a game of who Pip's benefactor is, 'how are you living?'' I hope you have this well?' these are only a few questions he keeps shooting at him. Then it is finally revealed. ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens has conveyed that Pip has no faith in 'Miss Havisham', that she has 'no intentions for' him that they are 'not designed for' him. His desires are nothing but a mere childhood dream. The 'black veil' on Pip's face must now open up and we will now see what lies ahead of him. Dickens has used repletion on the images and sounds in this chapter, and has also played with Pip's feelings, which also plays with the readers feelings, we now what Pip knows, there was no dramatic irony, this was a surprise for Pip and the reader, which to me is good way of writing a story, all we knew is what Pip knew. So in conclusion I believe that Dickens has created the most powerful chapter in Great Expectations and he has made Pip realise a valuable lesson: that noting is what it seems, that everything that once was, is lost, and everything that should have been remembered, was forgotten and that a dream and turn into a nightmare- into a linear sequence of scares, but still have an effect on your subconscience. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. The importance of settings in 'Great Expectations'

    Also the build up and anticipation Pip and the reader feels towards the look of Satis House are very different to the shocking mess, which was to be found Pip actually arrived there. Although subtle through his settings, Dickens left clues about each characters background through each setting e.g.

  2. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    now been killed and he's now left alone and helplessly 'dead' on the floor, ready to be mercilessly dealt with by the unidentified stranger. All this is good at creating tension in the atmosphere because it still maintains the suspense of seeing pips chaser who now has all the power

  1. Great Expectations - Analyse how Dickens maintains suspense in Chapter 39

    Dickens uses the weather to create an atmosphere, which also reflects Pip's feelings. An example is, "rage of wind and rush of rain". This creates the moody atmosphere, as well as revealing what is going on in his mind. The weather atmosphere suggests that he is scared, confused and those feelings are rushing around in his mind.

  2. Charles Dickens Great Expectations explore the themes used by Dickens in chapter one

    "Now lookee here!" said the man. "Where's your mother?" "There, sir!" said I. He started, made a short run, and stopped and looked over his shoulder. "There, sir!" I timidly explained. "Also Georgiana. That's my mother." "Oh!" said he, coming back. "And is that your father alonger your mother?" "Yes, sir," said I; "him too; late of this parish."

  1. How does chapter 8 prepare the reader for the novel to follow?prose coursework: great ...

    An advantage of this is that the original reader, if having missed an issue, can have a summary of what has happened. The novel is the Victorian equivalent to soap operas of today. Nevertheless, as we are introduced to these new characters this will not be the case.

  2. How does Chapter One of 'Great Expectations' prepare a reader for the rest of ...

    some food and a file, this is echoed later in the novel, when his good deed is to paid him back. The convict also cares about Pip. Both characters reflect each other. Both are outcasts, unwanted and lost in this "bleak" world.

  1. In this essay, I will discuss three different locations that are of special importance ...

    This emphasises the solitude of the place and makes the reader lonely. Pip is overpowered by the cold of the marshes. 'The damp cold seemed riveted (to my feet) as the iron was riveted to the leg of the man I was running to meet.'

  2. Great expectations-scene one and scene 39

    who's using force and threats to get what he needs, and al Pip can do is go along with it, he has no choice in the matter. Then when Magwitch is reintroduced into the story in chapter 39 he has a more gentleman-like appearance and has manners, and also tells

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work