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Why is setting significant in Lord of the Flies?

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Introduction

Why is setting significant in Lord of the Flies? In Lord of the Flies, the setting has an important influence on the story and the actions of the characters in it. As it is set on a deserted Island, isolated away from society and civilisation, it allows a microcosm to be born. A plane crash causes the schoolboys to land on the Island and force them to create civilisation between themselves. The fact that the boys are away from rules and reason give them lease to misbehave and do as they wish, which couldn't be done if they were lost somewhere else, highlighting the importance of the Island's isolation. The idea of being without "grown-ups" seems daunting to Piggy, but for the rest of the group it is more like an adventure. ...read more.

Middle

On the Island, where there are no grown-ups, there are no boundaries. Because all the boys are just children, they have not learnt the proper values of what civilisation means and how it is created, or how to live in peace. Most of the boys did not know eachother and therefore have to live amongside strangers, and instead of trying to do it in a collected way, because the majority haven't yet learnt manners, there are many arguements and the civilisation that was somewhat built up during the reign of Ralph deteriorates very quickly. The boys are no longer willing to do their duties, and simply cannot be bothered to respect others anymore. This gets to such an extremity, which is highlighted by the murders of Piggy and Simon. ...read more.

Conclusion

The island in which the boys inhabit is presented as perfect and luxurious. "Palm and beach and water drew to a point at infinity", all pleasurable features. The island is described as lush, comparable to the Garden of Eden. Placing the boys away from society in a "paradise" place like Eden suggests that Golding is suggesting the traits of violence and savage are innate in the boys, or that those feelings are inevitable. In conclusion I think that the setting - of an Island - was important to the story because it simply could not have happened in a different sort of setting. The island allowed a microcosm to be born amongst the boys and allowed them to be away from order, civilisation, rules and society. This allows them to create the small amount of civilisation that they do create before it is torn down. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Although there are some key points made about language choices in this essay the response as whole is too superficial and doesn't show an in depth understanding of the text.

3 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 19/06/2013

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