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Why may a reader consider Lord of the Flies to be a frightening novel?

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Introduction

Why may a reader consider Lord of the Flies to be a frightening novel? Write about: what may make a reader feel Lord of the Flies is a frightening novel how Golding makes a reader consider it a frightening novel. 'Lord of the Flies' could be seen by many as a frightening novel. It features small boys getting left on an island with no adults. We witness the progression of the characters from a childish innocence to pure savages. When first put on the island, the boys are excited by the prospect of no grown-ups. Piggy is the one to initiate any kind of order; he wants to 'make a list' and 'have a meeting'. ...read more.

Middle

Jack's obsession with hunting begins here; something inside him is awoken. They've only been on the island a few hours, and Jack is already attempting to kill a pig. However, they realise the 'enormity' of stabbing a living thing and can't face the 'unbearable blood'. At this stage, the conch is the symbol of respect, authority and silence. They respect the conch. The choir are already embracing life on the island and disregarding civilisation as they had 'discarded their cloaks'. However, Jack doesn't respect Ralph or the conch; he interrupts them 'excitedly' as he expresses his desire of having 'lots of rules'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Roger wants to act on his violent impulse, it's only the last grip society has on him that stops him. The significant moment of descending into savagery is Jack's first kill. The pig is a metaphor of their morals and innocence: they've lost both. These 12 year old boys lose the grip society has on them. It encourages the reader to consider how awful the World would be without any rules or authority in an anarchy environment. It shows how this moral fabric is rarely within us (like Simon) but instead given to us by civilisation. Without this thread, everyone, even innocent children, have a great capacity for evil. ...read more.

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