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Why not visit Pakistan? I would be lying to you if I said that I was not eagerly anticipating a visit to my ancestors country.

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Why not visit Pakistan? (Problematic Pakistan- current "sorry" state of affairs) I would be lying to you if I said that I was not eagerly anticipating a visit to my ancestor's country. Yet I was still dreading my adventure because of the countless amount of negative news coverage in the media! This was mainly due to Pakistan's increasing security dangers which were: suicide bombings, honour killings and kidnappings. In addition to this, I was dreading the eight hour expedition mainly at the prospect of being crammed like sardines by PIA. I endeavoured to make the most of the hospitality of PIA (the so called "premier airline" of Pakistan because there is only one). You just had to be overwhelmed by the daunting, structure of this plane. It was populated predominately by Pakistanis as the green land is an unattractive destination for modern, wacky sophisticated westerners as Pakistan is still (yes still) stuck in medieval Victorian times. ...read more.


The rice was terribly overcooked. It lacked the flavours which you would associate with brilliant, fine Asian cuisine of high repute. This was a second class service from a so called pioneering, premier aircraft service. Not only was my appetite ruined, my mood had not improved since I stepped on the plane three tedious hours ago. Five lingering hours prolonged my misery on this plane. Luckily for me, I survived my ordeal and we touched down at the palatial Islamabad airport with no delays. I breathed a huge exasperated sigh of relief. My first step in the wilderness was met gratefully by sweltering rain. I was escorted to the airport by a benevolent member of staff who was wearing brown rags which were basically a shabby, shoddy and skimpy uniform. I sympathized with his impoverished state and paid him a chunky commission of 25 rupees (30p) which he graciously accepted, expressing his gratitude at my deed by offering countless "Mehrbani's" and excessive prayers. ...read more.


The food lifts you and tingles your parched taste buds. They also pack a heavy punch. I reached for the room service button and duly ordered Chicken biryani (Pakistan's very own speciality which rivals many). I was eagerly anticipating munching into what I thought should be fine scrumptious food cooked with love. Half an hour elapsed. I waited. Waited. No food arrived. I frantically searched for my boots when... The knock came. On the opposite side of the colossal arched doorway stood a teen. He spoke in fluent urdu and I could sense that he was anxious. "Sorry saab,no chicken", he ushered. "What do you mean no chicken? You should have told me 30 minutes ago", I shouted. He dejectedly raced out.Once my hot anger cooled , I realised the poor customer satisfaction I experienced today reflected the dysfunctional society. I decided to spend the rest of my time scouring this once prosperous great country, but knew that I should expect the unexpected. ...read more.

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