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Wilfred Owens poem Dulce et Decorum Est is a very powerful and moving war poem. It is a protest against all innocent lives lost in the war

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Introduction

Wilfred Owen, Dulce et decorum Est. In no more than 500 words, write an account of this poem in continuous prose, showing how the technique used creates the effect that led your interpretation of the meaning of the poem. Wilfred Owen?s poem ?Dulce et Decorum Est? is a very powerful and moving war poem. It is a protest against all innocent lives lost in the war and also a protest against all the lies that are told about how glorious it is to die for your country. Sarcasm and anger dominate the mood of the poem with descriptions of dreadful and undignified struggle of soldiers during WW1 and strong criticism of civilians who promote war effort. This effect is achieved throughout the poem with wide use of alliteration, imagery and emotive language. ...read more.

Middle

The first stanza of the poem gives us a clear and detailed picture about the state of soldiers walking from the battlefield. Owen uses imagery ?like old beggar?, ?coughing like hags?, ?all went lame? and ?drunk with fatigue? to give us a detailed picture about the horrific state of soldiers broken by the war. The poet compares the soldiers to blind, exhausted and coughing beggars which is a complete opposite to proud soldiers marching in their uniform. Using alliteration ?knock-kneed? and ?man march asleep?, the poet wants the reader to consider the fragile physical and mental state of the soldiers. Owen?s use of frightening verbs ?yelling, stumbling? guttering, choking and drowning? in the second and the third stanza and imagery ?flound ring like a man in fire? and ?I saw him drowning? helps to set the ghastly mood and to visualize the desperation of the effected men during the gas attack. ...read more.

Conclusion

Owen also draws our attention to the torment and suffering of a dying man which can leave the reader uncomfortable. The bitter tone and sarcasm is clear in the last four lines of the poem. In line 25 the poet address the reader ?my friend? which is very personal and in line 26 he calls the soldiers ?children? which could be understood that they are innocent and helpless. Owen express his bitterness by using words ?zest? and ?glory? which are in complete contrast with the reality of the war full of horror and he derides the thought that it is sweet and honourable to die for your country. If people would know the true reality of the war, they would not be so eager to send their ?children? to join the war effort. Word count: 547 ...read more.

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