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William Blake

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Introduction

William Blake I am going to compare and contrast three of William Blake poems, where he shows his feelings about the way people treat children: The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London. The Chimney-Sweeper is about a child who sweeps chimneys. William Blake sets this poem in the winter. The children worked in the cold. Blake says, "A little black thing among the snow," "The little black thing," Is the child who is dirty from cleaning the chimneys who stands out in the snow. He also looks like a black mask on the landscape. Like a dirty stain. "Crying weep, weep in the notes of woe!" Blake hears them crying a song. As children do when they are sad, the notes of woe are notes of extreme sadness. "Where are both father and mother? Say? They are both gone up to the church to pray" this sounds as if someone is asking the boy questions and he answers. The child's parents are missing. They don't know where their parent are, they could be praying at church. The church back then was in possession of a lot of land, building and laid down guide lives for people's life styles. ...read more.

Middle

The black dust got into lungs also killed the children. The church was appalled by the number of death from the chimney. It was a 'black' mark on society to allow death to occur from such an awful inhumane job. It reflects on the church, because the church bell rings every time when someone died. There is hypocrisy as the church is linked to the government and the church doesn't do any thing to stop this pain, even though they are against cruelty. He sighs his unhappiness and depletion of his life as a soldier. An important role it may be, but it is not his choice, so his life is spent running the blood down the wall of rich, selfish kings and government. "but most thro' midnight streets I hear How the youthful harlot's curse Blast the new born infants tear, And blights with plagues the marriage hearse" In the last stanza, the poet sees and hears the cries of the young women for the birth of their babies. They would be unhappy about the poor, sad lives these children will have, and they will also regret their birth. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the same idea "The Chimney Sweeper" is also about children, who are neglected by parents as well as teachers. They have to do the dirty work and go down chimneys. William Blake chose to criticise the Church and the wealthy, including the priests and the King. Blake chose to criticise the priest and King for not noticing and accepting the bad environment the poor are living in. Blake doesn't like the Priest and Church for not caring for the poor, even though they worship God and the Priest, it is unfair. Blake thought very highly of children, he felt sorry for the children who became chimney sweeping. He states this many times in his poetry. He thought that the children were the future and that they shouldn't be treated like dirt. They shouldn't get starved for hunger, the wealthy should have looked after the children, but they didn't. The children didn't get any importance then. Blake wanted the rich to know the suffering and pain they have put the poor side through. This povety is also happening in the world now and William Blake now helps the world relise that there is povety in the world, and also emphasizes to care for he poor. Umar Waqar 1 4/26/2007 ...read more.

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