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William Blake: Freedom and Repression

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William Blake Presentation- The most important theme in Blake's poetry is that of freedom and repression. Freedom is a key concept in Blake's poetry. The transformation from Inccocnece to Experience shows how freedom is transformed into a constrained repression when an individual discovers more about the word in which they live in. The poem "The Echoing Green" from Songs Of "Innocence" demonstrates how freedom projects so much happiness into a child, which gives them there unrestrained, and innocent quality. The Joyful language of "The Merry Bells" and "Happy the Skies" suggests that when a Child's voice is able to "Echo" into the distance, their surroundings are able to reply in a pleasant and joyful tone. I thought it was particularly effective how the poem started with "The Sun Does Arise" and ended with "The Sun Does Descend". The progression of the sun supports my outlook that the freedom of innocence will soon transform into the dark repression of Experience as a child discovers more about the systems of society. ...read more.


The Theme of Freedom and repression is proficiently put into context at the End Of London. The Line "Blights with plagues the Marriage hearse" combines love and desire with death and destruction- Two possibilities for the Future of the Children mentioned in the poems. Taking Blake's other themes and issues into account, it is easy to see how Freedom and repression marks a high degree of importance in his poems. As Blake was not part of any established church, it gave him the freedom to broaden his communal belief's as opposed to being governed by one religion. "A Little Boy Lost" is an effective example of demonstrating an unrestricted connection to the Church, which gave many people the opportunity to live a life of liberation. The line "The weeping child could not be heard", is effectual in demonstrating Blake's belief towards Christianity. suggesting that those who separate themselves from the church have a less valid voice, and therefore live a life of repressed indignation, detached from the world of "thy Father", Jesus. ...read more.


"The Sick Rose" from songs of experience, is effective in demonstrating how such figures of love and beauty, like a woman, can be transformed into deceitful and corrupted symbols. The quote "the invisible worm, that flies in the night", is effectual in illustrating how the symbols of passion can be filled with much darker forces that will turn it oppressive. The "bed" into which the worm creeps denotes both the natural flowerbed and also the lovers' bed. The 'death' and 'deceit' that the worm represents, suggests that just like the flower bed, love is sick aswell. I thought that this poem was particularly effective in relating to Blake's wider issues. Just how an innocent object like the Rose has been 'poisoned' by sexual corruption, the innocent children in Blake's other poems have been 'poisoned' by the conflicts of religion and morality. As a whole, Blake's representations of freedom and repression are effective in showing his beliefs, and how they contrast with reality. "Blake was against anything anyone else thought" (Matthew Collings) ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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