• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

William Goldings Lord of the Flies portrays a society not founded on a bedrock of rules which succumbs to evil.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐The Dangers of Being Consumed by Evil Civilized society is maintained through strict adherence to rules, rational behaviour, and repression of personal desires. Order can more readily prevail if a society strives to be civilized. However, where order fails, it allows evil to permeate the society. William Golding?s Lord of the Flies portrays a society not founded on a bedrock of rules which succumbs to evil. The lack of authority in Golding?s society causes the stranded British boys to plummet into an anarchic lifestyle full of violence and hate. Jack, the initiator of this downfall, introduces the boys to savage behaviour through the formation of a religion rooted in the manifestation of the beast. Although Jack is the primary implementer of evil, the true evil within the novella is intangible ? human nature itself. Golding uses Jack to exemplify the darkness that exists in the human heart and its ability to corrupt the soul if not checked by reason and restraint. In Golding?s Lord of the Flies, Jack is tainted by the unrecognized evil on the island, completing his fall from innocence and plunging him into destruction and savagery, resulting in his corruption. Jack?s fall from innocence begins with his uncontrollable urge to hunt and continues with the manifestation of the beast. ...read more.

Middle

Golding replaces Jack?s name with Chief within the narration, perpetuating Jack?s fall from innocence. Golding leaves no doubt that anarchy has spread on the island, with Jack becoming a symbol of evil. When Jack is questioned, ?a savage raise[s] his hand? (177) to speak. Golding also transforms the identities of the tribe members, establishing their loss of innocence, as well as establishing them as violent, vicious pawns of Jack?s coercive rule. Furthermore, Jack?s use of violence clearly signals the transition of power and the spread of destruction and savagery. His vicious and belligerent ways establish a sense of fear within the boys. Jack sends a strong message to his tribe when ?he [gets] angry and [makes] [his tribe members] tie Wilfred up? (176). Jack beats one of the boys for no apparent reason, to strike fear into the hearts of the rest of the tribe, making them conform to his anarchy. Through violence and disorder, Jack further strips away his innocence and embraces his corrupted nature. Through the use of the beast, Jack forms a religion rooted in ritual and savagery. The foundation of this religion is based on the boys? deep fear of the beast. ...read more.

Conclusion

Simon?s murder marks Jack?s entire loss of innocence. Once Jack has committed the taboo act of murder, there is no turning back from his corruption. His primary tool to justify Simon?s murder is the beast. He states that the ?[beast] came disguised? (177) as Simon. Jack characterizes the beast as an immortal and shape shifting creature. By doing so, Jack is creating an excuse to kill again. Jack does not feel any apprehension about murdering again, continuing his fall from innocence. Simon?s murder ultimately marks the point of no return in Jack?s corruption. In Lord of the Flies, Jack is stained with the innate evil of humankind, triggering his fall from innocence and journey towards savagery and corruption. Golding portrays Jack?s corruption through his coercive rule where violence, war, and deviance are emphasized. Jack initiates the anarchic lifestyle on the island through the manifestation of the beast and the formation of a cult-like religion. Finally, Golding utilizes Jack to depict the evil within the human soul and its ability to be unleashed if not restrained by the rules of society. An ordered social structure enables civilized behaviour to prevail, whereas the lack of it allows for evil to penetrate the surface of human nature and begin its manifestation. ________________ [1] Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. London: Faber and Faber, 1954. 51. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Golding section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Golding essays

  1. William Golding's Lord of the Flies is a tale of tragedy and conflict within ...

    was too small to be a beast, they still didn't recognise him. The book makes this clear, because it describes the incident from the point of view of one of the hunters who mistakes Simon for the beast, creeping out from the dark jungle.

  2. Themes, Motifs, and Symbols - Themes are the fundamental concepts addressed and explored in ...

    by any monstrous beast but by a principle of savagery embedded deep within all of them. Fearing that it is embedded within himself as well, he seems to hear the Lord of the Flies speaking to him, threatening him with what he most fears.

  1. Analysis of Lord of the Flies.

    Piggy, who still seems to have no irrational side at this point in the book, is simply baffled and disgusted. Ralph, who has seen what he thinks is the beast, is listless and depressed, unsure of how to reconcile his civilized ideals with the sight he saw on the mountaintop.

  2. Both Lord of the Flies and Frankenstein explore the factors of nature and nurture ...

    gazed with a kind of wonder" he is enchanted by it, (which begins an important association of the monster with night.) This reveals his true nature; the monster is a benign being. His innocence is seen in the simplicity of his language and actions.

  1. Explain and Describe the Emergence and Rise of the Beast in 'Lord of the ...

    The beast is a symbol of the children's fear and their evil, which is of the mind. The first notion of hostility on the island is when a bird is heard 'When a bird, a vision of red and yellow, flashed upwards with a witch-like cry; and this cry was echoed by another' Pg.

  2. Explain the emergence and rise of the beast in Lord of the flies by ...

    The Spire is an allegory concerning the protagonist's obsessive determination to build a cathedral spire regardless of the consequences. As well as his novels and his early collection of poems, Golding also published a play entitled "The Brass Butterfly" in 1958 and two collections of essays, The Hot Gates (1965)

  1. "Discuss William Golding's use of symbolism in 'Lord of the Flies'".

    Hitler claimed that the Jews were bad for the country, that they would one day try to take over, of cause that was a load of nonsense, but Hitler used it to his advantage, using other races and religions as well, saying that they where also bad for the country, and they had to get rid of them.

  2. A media study comparing two cinematic interpretations of Golding's "Lord of the Flies" the ...

    This worked very well for the film. The title is then brought up onto the screen against a black background with the films theme tune. In my opinion, I feel this has worked better than Peter Brooke's opening credits because there's more drama and suspense about, whether these boys are

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work