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William Wordsworth and William Blake wrote poems about London, but they presented their views from different angles.

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� 13����0�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�$bjbj�2�2 (.�X�X��������������������8� ���vZ\\\\\\$QR�p������(((��Z(Z((:��: �u�����:Z�0�: :������ �: (��(William Wordsworth and William Blake wrote poems about London, but they presented their views from different angles. Wordsworth sees the beauty in London and Blake sees only the ugliness. William Wordsworth's "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" gives a step-by-step look at the awe-inspiring beauty of a London sunrise, whereas William Blake's "London" shows the dreary ugliness of London life by taking a stroll down London's streets. "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" affects the reader with a sense of wonderment at the beauty that is created with a sunrise. London appears to be the most beautiful place on earth during a sunrise. The sun bathes the city in light and gives the reader a sense of purity and cleanliness. "London" affects the reader with an opposite feeling. The reader sees the unsavory side of London in the faces of its citizens. The citizens of London are unhappy with their lives, but they accept it with resignation. It is appalling how the Church uses the small chimney-sweeping children to clean the soot of London and the poor become soldiers that die for the monarchy. The purity and cleanliness of London is lost when young women become prostitutes. The death that falls upon a marriage is often transmitted through the diseases a prostitute passes on. ...read more.

Middle

(11) and"... the very houses seem asleep" (13). Blake's imagery stresses the sounds of London as well as the visual. His repetition of the word cry "In every cry�" (5), "... cry of fear," (6), and "... chimney-sweeper's cry" (9) has the reader hearing the voices of the people in London. It is reinforced with"... soldier's sigh" (11) and"... harlot's curse! Blasts..." (14,15). The reader can visually see the signs of sadness and resignation on the faces of the citizens with "And mark in every face I meet / Marks of weakness, marks of woe" (3,4). A dark ugly stain of soot is seen with "How the chimney-sweeper's cry / Every black'ning church..." (9,10) and the waste of life is in "And the hapless soldier's sigh / Runs in blood down palace walls." (11,12). The rhythm of each poem adds to the intensity of the feelings. Wordsworth keeps his rhythm steady with only one surprise. The iambic pentameter flow of "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" has the reader calmly and peacefully following the morning sunrise. To keep from totally boring the reader, Wordsworth suddenly creates an experience of great wonder and discovery with the spondee occurring in "Dear God!..." (13). Blake switches his rhythm at the halfway point in his poem. The iambic tetrameter in the first two stanzas of "London" has the reader amiably walking down a London street casually observing ...read more.

Conclusion

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