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With close reference to the texts studied, compare and contrast the ways in which writers convey character, setting and atmosphere.

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Introduction

With close reference to the texts studied, compare and contrast the ways in which writers convey character, setting and atmosphere. In this essay I will be comparing the ways in which Susan Hill and Charles Dickens convey character, setting and atmosphere in "I'm the King of the Castle" and "Great Expectations". From "I'm the King of the Castle" I will mostly be focusing on extracts from chapter one, from "Great Expectations" I will focus mainly on chapters one and eight. The opening of "I'm the King of the Castle" focuses on two characters, Mr. Hooper (Joseph) and his son, Edmund Hooper. The opening of "Great Expectations" is describing Pip; following this he describes an escaped convict. Pip is the narrator in "Great Expectations" so everything is from his point of view. ...read more.

Middle

In "I'm the King of the Castle" this is shown by the way that Mr. Hooper talks to Edmund, "Edmund, you will not be difficult". Another way in which Estella and Edmund are alike is that Estella has Pip come to her house, in a similar way that Edmund has Kingshaw come to his house. "I'm the King of the Castle" focuses mainly on one house, Warings. "Great Expectations" looks at one house, Miss Havisham's house. The book, unlike "I'm the King of the Castle" doesn't describe where Pip lives. Both Miss Havisham's house and Warings hold many secrets; similarly both Pip and Edmund want to explore the houses to find out more. The difference is that Edmund is exploring Warings, where as Pip is too scared to explore Miss Havishsham's house. ...read more.

Conclusion

In "Great Expectations" this is portrayed by the darkness of the corridors and the way that Pip is feeling. Which leads me onto another point, I think the way Pip is feeling the first time he visits Miss Havisham is represented by the darkness and the foreboding atmosphere. Another view is that Miss Havishams house is described as being very enclosed and old in a physical sense, where as Warings is enclosed in the sense that Edmund isn't allowed to do as he pleases all the time and old in the sense that somebody has recently died there and there is few young people around. Having looked at all the points I have come to the conclusion that even though Susan Hill and Charles Dickens lived at different times and wrote about different things from different perspectives they often wrote using the same ways of describing things. ...read more.

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