• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With particular reference to the final scene of the play (from Gerald's reappearance on p.61) explore how priestley demonstrates the contrast between the generations.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

With particular reference to the final scene of the play (from Gerald's reappearance on p.61) explore how priestley demonstrates the contrast between the generations. The two generations have both got very different characteristics. Priestley demonstrates the contrast in the generations by using language. This is shown in the first act when Sheila uses slang to tell Eric he is drunk, "you're squiffy" she tells him. This use of slang emphasises her youth. On the other hand Mr Birling uses no such slang and shows how full of self-importance he is by the words and the language he uses, when he interrupts Eric in mid sentence and says "Just let me finish, Eric.". Mr Birling only cares for what he thinks and does not even consider that Eric might have something important to say. Mrs Birling is very uptight and represents the upper class, she does not like the use of obscene language and complains to Mr Birling when he uses inappropriate language. When Mr Birling says to Sheila "Look - for God's sake!" Mrs Birling immediately protests at Mr Birling and says "Arthur!" as if to tell him to watch his language. Eric shows signs of immaturity in Act 1 when he interrupts Mr Birling to propose that they all think to Sheila and Gerald's health instead of Mr Birling making a speech, "Well, don't do any. ...read more.

Middle

He refuses to learn his responsibilities to others less fortunate than himself and is unsympathetic. As the play continues we see how Sheila begins to realise that her father is a hard headed business man and is insensitive to everyone but himself. Mrs Birling is very similar ion attitude to Mr Birling and will not accept responsibility for her actions and insists that none of the family have really done much wrong, after Sheila has confests and decided to stay to hear the rest of the reason why Eva Smith committed suicide, Mrs Birling says "I don't suppose for a moment that we can understand why the girl committed suicide. Girls of that class", this shows Mrs Birlings complete ignorance to the lower class and is a way of Priestley showing the audience how poorly the lower class were treated by the upper class Sheila and Eric have a completely opposite attitude, they are ready to learn from the experience and this proves the contrast between them and their parents. Mr Birling considers himself to have a very high status in society. He is a prosperous factory owner, a local magistrate and ex-Lord Mayor of Brumley. His first priority is to make money, as he admits in conversation "It's my duty to keep labour costs down", and therefore he pays his employees no more than the going rate. ...read more.

Conclusion

is like the older generation, he does not take in the message that the inspector was putting across and tries to forget the whole thing happened. This is shown when he tries to offer Sheila the engagement ring again assuming that it was now over and that she would just forget about his affair. Priestley tries to convey the message to the readers that the older generation are only interested in making money and their position in society. Priestley chose Mr and Mrs Birling to represent the upper class and uses the language and plot to show his hatred of the behaviour and attitutues of the upper class. Sheila and Eric are left to learn from the mistakes of the older generation and to ensure that the mistakes are not repeated. Priestley uses Sheila and Eric as a constant voice and to tell the audience that Eva Smith could be anyone and that we all do things like this everyday and do not realise the possible consequences. They are the only open characters and are there to represent the lower class and show sensitivity towards them. Throughout the play she is there to remind the audience how her family treated and spoilted the life of a young girl. Priestley must have felt that he needed to send a message to the audience reminding them how badly the upper class treated the lower class. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE J.B. Priestley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work