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With reference, in particular, to the birth of the monster, compare and contrast Frankenstein 1994 to Frankenstein 1957 Over the past hundred years, Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein has been read worldwide

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Introduction

With reference, in particular, to the birth of the monster, compare and contrast Frankenstein 1994 to Frankenstein 1957 Over the past hundred years, Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein has been read worldwide, by many different audiences. In the original novel, the creature is given life by Frankenstein, and then he stretches out his arm to see if Frankenstein will accept him as a son. Whereas in the 1957 film he is in a box full of water, and is wrapped in bandages. The creature tries to strangle Frankenstein until he is stopped by Paul. In contrast, the 1994 film portrays the birth differently; Frankenstein is seen running around his lab and is all sweaty and dirty. Once the creature is alive he falls on the floor into all the liquid and he and Frankenstein roll about in it. ...read more.

Middle

This is something which is not used in the 1957 version. In contrast the 1957 film's director chooses to make Frankenstein wear a suit and work in a very stereotypical lab. Although the 1994 film chooses to use a wider environment, this film decides to use gothic horror, which the other film doesn't, they do this by using lightening when the creature is born. In the 1957 film Frankenstein is portrayed as a posh, snobby and self obsessed this is show by the house he lives in, his servants and the fact that he is always in his lab working on his creation. Good friends like Paul fall out with him because of his creation, Frankenstein is so driven he doesn't care that his best friend has left. In comparison the 1994 film chooses to show Frankenstein as a man that is driven, falls out with Clerval and Elizabeth, ...read more.

Conclusion

The music in the 1957 film is very effective and stands out because of the lack of special effects. The music is very dramatic and gives away what is about to happen, also the music is heard more because of the film not moving at a fast pace. Although music is used a lot in the 1994 film, it is not heard as much because of the special effects and the pace of the film. There are also many silences, which add to the drama. In 1957 this film would have been thought of as scary because the audience at the time were not exposed to the sort of films that are around today. This film is not thought scary today because of the advances in film making technology. The 1994 filmis thought of as normal today because of the demand for films like this by the public today, therefore there are many films like this one. ?? ?? ?? ?? Stuart Hardy B10C ...read more.

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