• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With reference to Act I scene I and Act III scene I of Shakespeare's 'Romeo And Juliet', how successful do you feel that Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Lurhman have been in interpreting the theme of feuding in their respective films?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo And Juliet With reference to Act I scene I and Act III scene I of Shakespeare's 'Romeo And Juliet', how successful do you feel that Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Lurhman have been in interpreting the theme of feuding in their respective films? Which of these do you prefer and why? In this essay I will suggest how each of the directors use music, camera shots, language, mood, clothing, special effects and location settings to demonstrate the build up of tension between the house of Montague and the house of Capulet, with correlation to Act I scene I and Act III scene I. I will compare the films and in conclusion voice my opinion on each. In the very first part of act I scene I the first people we are introduce to are Benvolio, Sampson and Gregory. We follow them as they drive their car through the streets of fair Verona being boisterous but entertaining so we are immediately on their side as the mood becomes more serious as the Montagues arrive. In both films, each director uses a public place for Act I scene i. Franco Zeffirelli uses a market place where as Baz Lurhman uses a petrol station. ...read more.

Middle

This may be a metaphor for cowboys and Indian who are questionably the most memorable adversaries in history, which may be trying to say that the Montagues and Capulets are following in their footsteps. I will now discuss how each director uses S.F.X (special effects) and how each director chooses to position his camera. Zeffirelli uses mainly wide screen shots of large groups of people. At the beginning of Act III Scene I he shoots Romeo and Mercutio talking in a court yard and even though its only the two of them in the shot, Zeffirelli still opts for a wider picture as if there was a huge crowd. As Zeffirelli's film was created quite a few years before Baz Lurhman's, there is obviously not going to be as many special effects although, he does use some mild stunts like sword fights and Mercutio falling down a flight of stairs as he dies. Baz Lurhman juxtaposes the sense of overwrought with slapstick humour. Lurhman uses a wider variation of special effects and he is definitely more creative with his camera shots. He uses a range of close ups (shots of a largish part of someone's body e.g: face, legs, arms) and extreme close ups (shots of a small part of someone's body e.g: eyes, mouth, feet, hands). ...read more.

Conclusion

Mercutio decides he will fight on behalf of Romeo but then Romeo arrives. He refuses to fight Tybalt. Tybalt will not let him get out of it. Romeo is kicked to the floor and hit by Tybalt until he pulls out his gun on Tybalt, although he doesn't pull the trigger. Mercutio hits Tybalt so they duel. Romeo intervenes as in Zeffirelli's film, and Mercutio is stabbed. He goes to the top of a stage and shouts "a plague on both your houses". This shows he blames both houses for his death. Even though Mercutio isn't a Capulet Tybalt killed him because he is associated with the Capulets. In conclusion, my opinion is that Baz Lurhman's version of Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' is more successful in proving to us how tense the feud between the houses actually is. I believe this because the actors are more emotional whilst they are speaking and they are more enthusiastic in each mood type for example act I scene I, at the garage, Benvolio and Tybalt sound as if they are capable of killing each other with speech. I believe the reason for my opinion is that Franco Zeffirreli's film was made so long ago that the acting which may have seemed very serious in it's time now seems almost pathetic as the tension takes a long time to be shown. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Using camera angles, soundtrack, costume, props and setting describe the world Baz Lurhman has ...

    The camera then focuses on Tybalt's face as he is introduced as the 'Prince of Cats' implying how powerful he is and the fact that his primacy allows him to have 9 lives, resembling a cat. His movements are slow but calculated.

  2. Compare and contrast the two 'Romeo and Juliet' films,by Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Luhrmann. ...

    We get the feeling that things are being rushed from one scene to another. Friar Lawrence is presented differently in both films. In the modern interpretation Friar Lawrence is a lot less father like and he's more like a friend to Romeo.

  1. How effectively do Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli interpret Act I Scene VI when ...

    He scraped a trencher?" The servant is getting annoyed with stress and is complaining. Both Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli leave this part of the scene out. This could be because both Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli can use camera shots, lighting and sounds to show urgency of getting a big party ready.

  2. DISCUSS THE CHALLENGES FACED BY A FILM DIRECTOR IN ADAPTING SHAKESPEARE'A WORK WHEN BRINGING ...

    Also finding the right people to play each part. Certain actors and actresses can adapt more easily to different film genres and character personalities and these things need to be matched to the perfect actor. The film I am going to look at in closer detail is Baz Luhrman's 'Romeo and Juliet'.

  1. Compare & Contrast The Ways In Which, 'Baz Luhrmann' & 'Franco Zeffirelli' Present Scene ...

    This whole sequence is very dramatic and quick. This is very similar to the Zeffirelli's version, since he decides to have quick shots of Fair Verona instead of what is install for the audience. The final part of the opening, by Baz Luhrmann is a plague of more high-speed images once again carefully chosen from the film.

  2. How does Shakespeare achieve drama and tension in Act 3 scene 5 (line 65 ...

    She is refusing to help her daughter. The entrance of Lord Capulet then heightens drama. His vocal tone begins with barely any anger but then rapidly mounts. After Lady Capulet delivers the line ' ay, sir; but she will none, she gives you thanks.

  1. How does Shakespeare make us feel increasingly sympathetic for Juliet in Act three scene ...

    There is great confusion through out the rest of this scene when her mother comes in to Juliet's room. Juliet is in tears as Romeo has left her, her mother jumps straight to the conclusion that she is morning over her cousin's death.

  2. Discuss this statement in relation to the prologue and Act 1 Scene 5 analysing ...

    The first was made in 1968, directed by a man called Franco Zeffirelli. The second was made in 1997 directed by Baz Luhrmann. They are both very different as Zeffirelli has kept it very traditional. As it is set in Verona, Italy in Elizabethan times just as Shakespeare had wanted it.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work