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With reference to two or three chapters, analyse how Charles Dickens creates powerful evocations of characters and places in Great expectations?

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Introduction

With reference to two or three chapters, analyse, how Charles Dickens creates powerful evocations of characters and places in Great expectations? In chapter eight Dickens begins with a detailed description of Satis House, we are given a vivid idea of what is in store for Pip right from the beginning. The language and phrases used emphasise the darkness and forbidding nature of the house. When Pip first enters the house he describes it as having, 'old bricks, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it. Some of the windows had been walled up; of those that remained, all the lower were rustily barred'. This adds to the atmosphere of darkness, because all the 'windows had been walled up'. In addition, there is a feeling of old age and this is portrayed when Dickens talks about the windows being 'rustily barred' and how the house was made from 'old bricks'. The mood is created by the portrayal of the dull, dusky and dispirited house. This is emphasised even more when Estella tells Pip about 'Satis House' meaning 'Enough House'. This could have two implications; one meaning is that the house is enough to satisfy anyone. Towards the end of the chapter, the reader will find that this is not the meaning that is being portrayed. ...read more.

Middle

His expectations were for it to be sophisticated and amazing, however he stated that he had, 'some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly'. Instead, his description of London is 'crooked, narrow, and dirty'. This was a big shock to Pip; it was the first time he had ever been exposed to such unhygienic conditions, because Mrs Joe was so clean. Pip's move is a drastic shift of setting, away from the desolated marshes of Kent and into the teeming crowds of the city. Dickens with his great knowledge of the London era evokes the city masterfully, describing the stink, the run down buildings, and the low life's roaming the streets through Pip's stunned perceptions. Pip was surprised because none of it was what he expected, he describes Smithfield as a 'shameful place being smeared with filth, fat, and blood and foam' and the alliteration used adds to the disgust. The country boy is amazed and displeased by the stench and the thronging crowds in such an area as Smithfield. The image conjured up in Pip's mind is 'dismal', as he used the word continuously throughout the beginning of the chapter. He describes London being the 'most dismal place' and he became 'fascinated by the dismal atmosphere'. In addition, the idea of a 'dismal atmosphere' is used during Pip's description of Satis house. ...read more.

Conclusion

This again portrays the filth and low life's who go to Mr Jaggers. Jagger in addition, treats his clients like dirt and is always asking for money. It shows how heartless he is because his priority is money, even if the client is not guilty, it all depends whether they have money or not. A further thing that disturbs Pip is how Mr Jaggers can stare at the cast on his shelf everyday. After being there for a few minutes, Pip has to leave the room, because the surroundings are to daunting for him. This tells us that Jaggers has no remorse for those that have died and once again is heartless, but also brave for being able to live in such peculiar and unnatural atmospheres. To conclude everything, Dickens creates a sense of dirt and filth through out London; He does this by describing the surroundings in immense detail using effective language. However, the main reason why the image is portrayed very effectively is the change of setting, from the quiet countryside to the busy city streets. A lot is emphasised on the relationship between character and setting, so it should be no surprise when Pip encounters objects of punishment and Justice everywhere he looks at Jaggers' work. Overall, the images of death are conjured up to indicate Mr Jaggers has power over life and death. Selina Couttignane 10.0 ...read more.

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