Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
  • Document length: 2462 words

World War One Poetry

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and contrast the purpose and style of Wilfred Owen's First World War poetry with the purpose and style of contemporary recruitment poems. The Ballad of Peace and War- Wilfred Owen Dulce et Decorum Est- Wilfred Owen Anthem for Doomed Youth- Wilfred Owen Who's for the Game?- Jessie Pope Fall In- Harold Begbie "What passing bells for those who die as cattle?" Wilfred Owen, Anthem for Doomed Youth "Who wants a turn to himself in the show?" Jessie Pope, Who's for the Game? The First World War began in 1914, following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on the 28th of June. The heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was shot by Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian Serb student. As retribution for this, Austria-Hungary demanded that Serbia punished those involved with the shooting. The conflict escalated as the Austro-Hungarian government deemed that Serbia had not fulfilled this demand and declared war. The major European powers had joined the war within a few weeks due to complex international alliances. Thus the original war had become the first global military conflict; the Entente or Allied powers, the British Empire, Russia, France and eventually Italy & America, against the Central powers, the Austro-Hungarian, German and Ottoman Empires. ...read more.

Middle

All of these techniques help Owen to achieve his purpose of expressing the horrors of trench warfare to the reader, thereby counteracting the effects of pro-war recruitment poetry. "Dulce et Decorum Est" was originally addressed directly to Jessie Pope, a poet and war enthusiast, who wrote poems such as "Who's for the Game?" in support of the recruitment campaign. Owen refers to Pope in the final lines of the poem as "my friend" and declares that Pope would not be so quick to encourage "children" to join the army if she had experienced life in the trenches. These lines are used by Owen to emphasise the fallacies of the recruitment campaign, which was led by those without experience of trench warfare. Jessie Pope was a well-known journalist who helped the recruitment campaign by writing war poetry for the Daily Mail and the Daily Express. Her writing reflected popular attitudes within society during the First World War and Pope herself has become infamous after Owen's reference to her in his first draft of "Dulce et Decorum Est". Pope's poem "Who's for the Game?" compares war to sport in order to achieve the purpose of recruitment poetry, which is to persuade men to join the army. ...read more.

Conclusion

This friendly style, also employed by Jessie Pope in "Who's for the Game?", is persuasive and helps to achieve Begbie's purpose because the reader is more likely to trust the content of the poetry if they feel a bond with the author. In "Fall In" each verse has a different scenario, such as in "far-off winter nights", to compare the results for those who fought in the war and those who did not. In each scenario the "lads who come back" are more successful so the plot of the poem helps achieve the poem's purpose by implying that is "Wrong" not to fight in the war. Begbie also capitalizes right and wrong in the phrase "And Right is smashed by Wrong?" to personify them and displaying the choice in a simplified manner which removes any empathy for those who do not fight, produces pro-war emotions within the reader and achieving the purpose of recruitment poetry. This also contrasts with the timeline of Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est", which describes only one scenario, not several, heightening the tension in each verse in order to build to a climax. Owen does this to sustain both the reader's interest and their emotional involvement so his conclusion will be more effective and persuasive, expressing the harsh reality of trench warfare. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. How is War Presented in Three WW1 Poems of Your Choice? Dulce Et Decorum ...

    As opposed to the words which Owen stated in his poem, Begbie seems to erase any feature of trench life, which causes war to sound more appealing. After all, the poem is an example of propaganda, as it is a recruitment poem.

  2. Three poems that encapsulate the different attitudes of conflict are Jessie Popes Whos for ...

    and the people who sent young men off to war with false stories of glory. Mackintosh served as a soldier during the war and had experienced the horrors it entailed. He was wounded at the Somme and was hospitalised in England.

  1. Dickinson's BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH

    The poem could be all that, if humor here were based on historical references to American realities and stereotypes. McGann insists that there transpires in these lines an implicit emotion, which he attributes to the location of the Dickinson homestead in Amherst: from her windows, Miss Emily could watch the hearses go by.

  2. Comparing Poets' Attitudes to Conflict in Mametz Wood by Owen Sheers and Futility by ...

    Memories in horror of finding the bodies of the dead soldiers who died from the war are presented in âMametz Woodâ, this is shown in line 2 âthe wasted young, turning up under their plough blades,â The word âwastedâ suggests that the soldiers shouldnât have died and this shows a

  1. Both 'Dulce et Decorum est' and 'Anthem for Doomed Youth' portray Owen's bitter angst ...

    die to the deafening sounds of the battlefield but still no one comes to their help. 'No mockeries no prayers nor bells nor choirs,' is the opening to the second quatrain and illustrates the way in which these soldiers die and that they do not even receive basic objects that would be expected in a traditional ceremony.

  2. Explore how Owen, McRae and Brooke present the physical and mental horrors of war.

    "Only the monstrous anger of the guns/Only the stuttering rifles rapid rattle". The "only" at the start of both lines implies the long monotony of war and the death, as if death has become so accepted that no just actions are taken upon it.

  1. 'Compare a selection of WW1 poetry to show how different aspects of the war ...

    describes how he saw the man choking and drowning in the sea of gas. He uses lots of emotive words like guttering and choking to describe what horror he saw in front of him. These four lines describe the man who had just died.

  2. Dolce et Decorum est

    They also help create imagery of what's happening for the reader. Another device used is similes. They are used in the piece to emphasize certain points about the poem, similarly in the last poem. They are also used like the verbs to create a much more in detail account of

  • Over 180,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work

Marked by a teacher

This essay has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the essay.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the essay page.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review under the essay preview on this page.