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Write a commentary on this passage (pg 54- 59), which explains the reasons for Pip's distress at the end.

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Introduction

KARAN SHAH OCTOBER 2003 ENGLISH Write a commentary on this passage (pg 54- 59), which explains the reasons for Pip's distress at the end. This passage is a crucial section of the book, as it is here that Pip realizes how coarse and common he is and where he first feels dissatisfied with Joe and realizes him not to be an idol. At the end of this section, Pip breaks down in tears and kicks the walls. Here I attempt to analyze the reasons for Pip's distress at the end. To begin with, Pip is disinclined to go to Ms. Havisham's house and play. He has never met Ms. Havisham but regards her as a peculiar, reclusive woman. He spends the night at Mr. Pumblechook's house and leaves for Ms Havisham's after a weary morning of arithmetic. Thus he arrives at the house dreading the visit and annoyed with Mr. Pumblechook. The following events further Pip's anger, irritation and lower his self-confidence, which results in him breaking down. ...read more.

Middle

Ms. Havisham then tells Pip that she has 'sick fancies' and asks him to play. Pip feels unequal to this task as his fear of Ms. Havisham and the gloomy atmosphere make him cringe at the very thought of playing. However he is worried that Ms. Havisham will complain to his sister and he will be upbraided. Thus Pip pleads with Ms. Havisham explaining the reasons why he cannot play. He begs Ms. Havisham to empathize with him. We can already see the reasons of Pip's distress. He has entered an unfamiliar and frightening environment against his will. He is afraid of Ms Havisham and although he is awestruck by Estella's beauty, he is to some extent afraid of her scorn and her arrogance. Ms Havisham then asks Pip to call Estella, when he tells her he cannot play. Ms. Havisham instructs Estella to play cards with him. Estella is reluctant to do so, she thinks of Pip as beneath her and refers to him as a common labouring boy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although her view is blatantly eccentric, Pip who regards the genteel as always right is more ashamed of himself and his 'commoness'. Estella the leads Pip down to the courtyard. She rudely tells Pip to wait in the courtyard while she gets something for him. Pip says- She came back, with some bread and meat and a little mug of beer. She put the mug down on the stones on the stones of the yard, and gave me the bread and meat without looking at me, insolently as if I were a dog in disgrace. I was so humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry, sorry- I cannot hit upon the right name for the smart- God knows what its name was- that tears started to my eyes. After Estella leaves Pip breaks down and weeps. He does so because he has been scorned, embarrassed and derided by the genteel, people who he now thinks of as admirable. Pip's self-confidence has been destroyed. He feels that he is common and trivial. Pip realizes that someone he has admired all his life, is actually not respect-worthy. ...read more.

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