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Write a letter to the documentary maker, Paul Hamann, explaining how effective you thought the film "Fourteen Days in May" was as an illustration of issues surrounding the use of capital punishment in the United States of America.

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Introduction

English Coursework Write a letter to the documentary maker, Paul Hamann, explaining how effective you thought the film "Fourteen Days in May" was as an illustration of issues surrounding the use of capital punishment in the United States of America. Dear Mr Hamann, I am writing to you regarding the documentary that you made on Edward Earl Johnson called "Fourteen Days in May". I overall found your documentary very informative and useful. However I personally thought that there are some things that you could of changed to make it better. At the beginning I think that the voice over off the radio, which informs us of all the information, is very useful. "Edward Earl Johnson was convicted of the 1979 shooting death of Walmet Grove Marshall J.P. Crest. Johnson's attorneys say they've got a strategy to save the inmate from execution on the 20th May. You get the initiative that you are there in Mississippi going to see the Edward Earl Johnson." Before I watched your documentary I had my own preconceptions about death row and the people who were on it. I thought that it was a place where very evil people were put when they have committed a serious offence, I felt that all the people here deserved to die and that I had nothing against them being executed. ...read more.

Middle

This means that I will get the best and most reliable information. I chose Edward Earl Johnson first to ask did he commit the murder. Even though one would think that straight away he would deny it, I think it is important for the viewers to see him personally say he didn't murder the Marshall. The fact I then asked the Marshall's family is important because then I can let the viewers see the other side of the story. How his family are coping with the loss of a husband, father, son etc. And also what they feel towards the man who has been charged with the murder of their loved one. I would have asked the prison governor because he will of seen many prisoners come and go on death row, therefore with his experience I could let the viewers see what he thinks. Next I would of asked Edward Earl Johnson's family whether they think their son committed the murder. This would let viewers see how they are coping as we would of let them see the Marshall's family. This means the viewers would of seen both sets of family and see how each one is affected in one way or another. ...read more.

Conclusion

At this point you really do understand how much the interviewer is with Edward Earl Johnson and in support of him. This makes you support Edward Earl Johnson even more. At the end of the documentary there is an interview with the lawyer of Edward Earl Johnson and in it when asked about the death of Edward Earl Johnson he says it is a "sick world". Based on what I know and my opinion of Edward Earl Johnson throughout the film I can only agree more with him. The effect, which this has it that an innocent man has been killed, and the lawyer thinks it should not of happened and this makes the audience feel sad and also angry for Edward Earl Johnson's family. My thoughts about death row have totally changed from the ones that I expressed at the beginning of the letter. Now I feel after seeing interviews with other cellmates and of course Edward Earl Johnson that it was not true. They all seem very normal and friendly and not murderers, and in Edward Earl Johnson's case many may be innocent but have been convicted wrongly, and killed. I do hope that you find the ideas I have added for your documentary very useful and possibly in the future use them for yourself. Yours Sincerely, Daniel Burke Daniel Burke 10M ...read more.

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