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Wuthering Heights.

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Introduction

WUTHERING HEIGHTS Emily Bronte was the middle woman in the most celebrated nineteenth century literary family. Supplemented by sister Anne and more renowned sibling Charlotte, she had a love for the Yorkshire moors and human passion, which are both reflected in the only novel she compiled in her 29 years - Wuthering Heights. At the time of its release, 1847, this controversial text divided many critics, and still does to this day. Many, me included, do not appreciate its content or intended objectives. Others oppose this viewpoint, stating that it's a masterpiece years, in terms of its originality, beyond the date of its initial publication. One thing does impress me in this carefully woven novel. Just as Francis Ford Coppola did with tremendous success in the Godfather Part II in 1976, Bronte splits the story into two with the future generation mirroring their ancestors, whether it be the characteristics or mistakes they duplicate there is an apparent resemblance between the old and new guard. The conflicting narrators provide both humour and useful insight into the inhabitants of the moors. Lockwood, the voice-over at the beginning, has acquired the tenancy of Thrushcross Grange and decides to introduce himself to his new landlord, Heathcliff. ...read more.

Middle

Catherine's tenure at Thrushcross Grange seems to have transformed her into a new person. After regaining full fitness, she returns a smart lady. The example of Catherine's class elevation in just over a month reflects the impact the environment appears to have on the inhabitants. At Thrushcross, the surroundings are beautiful and captivated with fresh air, which is shown in the Lintons. Meanwhile, at Wuthering Heights, the house, located in a particularly rough region, is fading quickly. This has obviously rubbed off on Heathcliff and Hindley, who are possessive and bitter. While Catherine's undoubted love for Heatcliff hasn't diminished in their separation, it, possibly inadvertently, contributes to the eventual termination of their relationship, as she has developed affection for Edgar Linton. Catherine is given an ultimatum: Heathcliff or Edgar. She famously tells Nelly Dean: "I am Heathcliff." This comment suggests that her allegiance with Heathcliff is unstoppable as he is a permanent part of her being, but her lust for a higher-class living and sense of security prevails. She chooses Linton. In my opinion, the primary focus of the novel, Catherine and Heathcliff's relationship captures, perhaps unintentionally, Bronte's use of symmetry and contrasts. ...read more.

Conclusion

(Catherine with Edgar and Heathcliff, Cathy with Linton and Hareton.) Their respective happiness, it seems is heavily influenced by the mere presence of Thrushcross Grange. As well as this, Catherine begins her life at Wuthering Heights and Cathy ends the novel there, rather like the aforementioned narrative symmetry between Lockwood and Nelly Dean. One intriguing thing is that while Thrushcross Grange brought the best out of the pair personally, it's difficult to say if it was there that they were their happiest there. Cathy must be relieved that she has found love with Hareton at the Heights after her previous marriage to Linton. And Catherine even confirmed it was Heathcliff, who she mingled with during her time at Wuthering Heights, not Edgar that she loved. Heathcliff remains the same throughout. An uncaring person, that divides two generations. First of all Mr. Earnshaw's relationship with his son Hindley deteriorates as a result and then later causes friction between Cathy and Edgar. As mentioned above with regards to Catherine and her daughter, Heathcliff is involved in the two three-way relationships. Participating in the original affair and emerging the unlucky party in conjunction with Edgar and Catherine and instigating Cathy's two marriages with son Linton and Hareton. Despite this though, Catherine who he's rightfully buried with, exposes his sensitive side, even after her death and his marriage to Isabella. ...read more.

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