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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront, symbolism is used continuously throughout, making it a brilliant, gripping story. In this essay I will be explaining how Bront uses it, like using physical appearances of each person to emphasise their character.

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Introduction

BRONT� USES IMAGERY EFFECTIVELY TO EMPHASISE THE CHARACTERS OF HEATHCLIFF, CATHERINE AND LINTON AND THEIR COMPLEX RELATIONSHIPS IN THE NOVEL. DISCUSS THIS STATEMENT In the novel, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront�, symbolism is used continuously throughout, making it a brilliant, gripping story. In this essay I will be explaining how Bront� uses it, like using physical appearances of each person to emphasise their character. I will also be writing about the way she describes the settings and how they are built or decorated to again enhance or create analogies of each character. Bront� not only uses these but also by cleverly making what each person says and how they say it, makes it be symbolic of what they are like. The weather and the atmosphere that they live in creates a picture of what is going on at certain points in the novel, like if characters are in an argumentative mood the weather will be dark which symbolises that state of mind. At the more poignant points in the text Bront� even refers to the supernatural or to natural phenomena to emphasise or illustrate the deep emotions of that person. Many metaphors and similes are used and also heaven and hell to symbolise the extreme parts of the story. All these brilliant techniques and devices create a great, powerful story of love and revenge. ...read more.

Middle

The question that needs to be considered is, who is the real Cathy? I think that she is being her real self when she is with Heathcliff because that is how she grew up. It could be argued that it is with Linton however because upon marriage she had truly changed but I consider that this is just a front to cover up that it is just a fantasy life with Edgar in Thrushcross Grange. In her conversation with Nelly, Cathy tries to compare Heathcliff and Linton, in her love for each of them. She speaks of the different feelings and thoughts of her relationships with them. Firstly with Heathcliff, he and Cathy are in deep, passionate love together. Bront� uses nature to enhance the way Cathy describes her love for him. But declares that, "It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now..." Heathcliff hears this and so leaves Wuthering Heights. If he had stayed he would have heard the following part of the conversation, which is where Cathy uses nature for imagery. She uses this to say that she loves Heathcliff so much and that it is so strong and even indestructible, "My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary..." She also says that they are joined as one person, "...his and mine are the same..." ...read more.

Conclusion

We can see that the way each reacts reflects the way we could have expected, due to how they have been portrayed throughout the text. To Conclude I can say that Bront� has successfully and effectively used all the types of imagery etc to symbolise each of the points made throughout the essay (speech, settings, weather...). The imagery that she uses is very effective to the reader and the novel can make people think beyond the storyline about what can happen if they were in situations like the characters have been in. The most effective part of the story for me was the speech between Nelly and Cathy, where Heathcliff hears Cathy say that it would degrade her to marry him. This part appealed to me because it made me think about what could have happened if he had heard the rest of the conversation and if it would have been a good novel. I thought that it would most probably not have been very gripping or even that good if it were to have happened. Although it didn't happen it still could keep the story as being powerful and evocative. I think that Wuthering Heights is about love but there are many other genres' that it could be, Revenge Spiritual or even a book about the Supernatural. Whatever the type if the storyline remained it would again still be an intensive, emotive novel. ?? ?? ?? ?? Oliver Lines 10W1 Bingley Grammar School English essay 8/12/02 ...read more.

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