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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront:

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Introduction

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront�: Chapter 12- Prose Commentary Wuthering Heights is a long and passionate tale about the treacheries of love and heartbreak, mixed with deviousness and insanity. The whole novel in general is very exciting and thrilling. It is filled with unexpected turns and a beautiful sense of literature. This particular passage refers to Chapter 12. In this chapter, Catherine begins to act mad, thinking she is dying, being afraid of her reflection in mirrors, and speaking aloud to a nonexistent Heathcliff as she did when they were children. This causes Nelly to bring Edgar up to her room to see Catherine's condition. This prose is when Edgar comes up to Catherine's room, and inquires Catherine about Heathcliff, which stirs up an outburst from Catherine. In result, Edgar Linton becomes angry at Ellen (Nelly) for not telling him the situation with Catherine. When Catherine starts to screech at Nelly, Edgar becomes more worried and sends Nelly to fetch the doctor. As Nelly is leaving the house, she spots Isabella's dog hanging by a handkerchief on the gate, almost dead. Suddenly Nelly catches a horse galloping away into the distance. At the time, she doesn't think much of it, but later in the story she discovers it was Heathcliff and Isabella, running away to elope. This is where the prose passage ends. ...read more.

Middle

When Catherine exclaims "I'll make her rue", she means that she'll make Nelly sorry for her evilness; she'll pay for her mischievousness. Through this chapter, we can see Catherine's disturbed mind and imagination. You can see she has a great deal of emotional layers and has a psychological problem. The way she speaks to Edgar shows that she doesn't care what he thinks or feels. She seems quite selfish overall, and has a sense of disregard for everyone except herself. Her arrogance and passion takes over the emotion of this passage. The way she disrespects Edgar shows her unfeeling, spoilt and bratty nature, with her anger, passion and fury coming and leaving as she pleases. Although one may have certain hatred towards Catherine's selfishness, I feel certain sympathy towards her because of her suffering. Not only that, but also I feel pity for where Catherine's disposition has lead her onto the wrong path, and her pathetic, dismal ways. This does not erase my disgust for Catherine as well, because her mind is a result of her path. Although Edgar is similar to Catherine in many ways, they have very different lives and minds. The following paragraphs will focus on his three speeches in the passage. The first of his lines (8-9) are spoken with a tone of desperation and astonishment. You can see that Edgar is shocked to hear that Catherine doesn't care about him. ...read more.

Conclusion

She shows devotion and faithfulness to her masters/mistresses, but still has a mind of her own. She is not put down by Edgar's authoritative tone, and shows herself to be independent. At this point I see Nelly as an intelligent woman with shrewdness and good common sense. She is actually becoming my most favorite character in the story, and I feel proud when Nelly stands up for herself. At the end at the last paragraph, the sound of hooves against the sidewalk leaves the reader in suspense. Even though Nelly disregards it as not something important, the occurrence is like a test to the reader to see if he/she had been paying attention to the little details. The strange incident of Isabella's dog almost hung off the gate also makes us suspicious; what exactly is going on? I believe that Emily Bront� intended to foreshadow what was about to happen later. All the way through this passage, there is a great deal of hidden meaning in each sentence that is spoken/ narrated. Many things are spoken with a twist and have deep significance. With just a short passage of 49 lines, one can determine and notice so many things about the characters and the stories. Even if I hadn't read the book, I still would have been able to guess many things about it. The narration itself is filled to the brim with personality, which makes it very interesting to read, and the style and context is genius. Nisha Kanabar 10R ...read more.

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