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WUTHERING HEIGHTS: What is the importance of Chapter nine in the novel as a whole?

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Introduction

Pre 20th Century Novel Coursework What is the importance of Chapter nine in the novel as a whole Chapter nine is a key chapter in the novel for several reasons. Firstly, it is a significant part of the overall plot; the events in this chapter dictate the remaining plot of the story. Secondly, it is in this chapter that the true natures and emotions of the main characters, Cathy and Heathcliff are revealed. Also, chapter nine demonstrates aspects of Victorian society and literature, which add to the readers understanding of the life of 'Wuthering Heights'. The chapter opens with Hindley coming home drunk. This part of the chapter has a strong atmosphere, the reader picks up the feeling that the house is generally very anxious and the tension is building up between the characters. Bronte uses evil language to add to the build up of tension in the text. She uses sentences like 'I want to kill some of you', 'devilish', 'bad,' and 'with the help of Satan'. These are all references to hell and sinful things add the final touches to create an atmosphere for the reader. The main story line at this moment also shows how tense the atmosphere really is as Hindley takes a knife to Nelly's mouth threatening to ram it down her throat. ...read more.

Middle

'My love for Linton is like the foliage of the woods. Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees-my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath.' This extract really gets across her passionate feelings about Heathcliff and how she is marring Edgar because there is know one else. Cathy also tells Nelly 'I am Heathcliff-he's always in my mind' this further adds to the emotional depth of Cathy really bringing out the true power of her feelings. This part of the chapter also has some gothic elements to it. These reflect the era the novel was wrote in as at this time gothic stories were popular so Bronte would have been influenced by these as she would of read this kind of book before she started writing her own novels. Cathy tells Nelly about the dream that she had the night before. She tells about how she went to heaven but it didn't seem to be the right place for her, so she started crying and crying until ' the angels were so angry they flung me out, into the middle of the heath of Wuthering Heights.' This dream reflects the supernatural gothic era that Bronte lived in. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, the symbolic splitting of the tree during the storm echoes the story. Cathy's reaction to Heathcliff's disappearance develops her character a lot more. You start to see how deep Cathy's feelings for Heathcliff are. It says how Cathy 'beat Hareton, or any child, at a good, passionate fit of crying.' This shows how much she is upset if she was crying as loud as a young child. The disappearance of Heathcliff makes Cathy become more passionate and even more demanding than she used to be, 'our young lady returned to us, saucier, and more passionate, and haughtier than ever.' This is evidence that Cathy's character develops during this chapter. This chapter is the hinging chapter for the rest of the book. The whole plot of the remaining story is influenced by the events of the chapter. If Heathcliff hadn't been listening to the convosation between Nelly and Cathy he wouldn't have left 'Wuthering Heights' so abruptly. Also if he had stayed a little longer to listen to what Cathy had to say, about how much she loves him but cant really be with him, then he would understand how much she loves him. This is why chapter nine of the novel is probably the most important chapter of the whole novel. Ben Little ...read more.

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