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An Examination of the coast line in the Swanage Area.

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Introduction

An Examination of the coast line in the Swanage Area Swanage and its surroundings is located in the South West of England, in the county of Dorset. It is located very close to Plymouth, a very important Port in the whole of Great Britain. Swanage is made up of 3 main bays and 3 main headlands. Studland bay and Swanage bay are made up of beaches. The beach in Swanage bay extends from 033787 to 035805 whilst Studland bay extends from 049825 extending northwards off the map. The main landform in Durlston bay are high cliffs. This bay extends from 035772 to 039786. The three headlands are the Foreland, Peveril Point and Durlston Head, the first located at 055824, the second at 041786 and the last at 036772. In this area, we can find many different coastal landforms such as spits, stacks, arches and caves. There is also a lot of Cliff erosion which causes many problems to the inhabitants of the area. ...read more.

Middle

This means that the base of the cliff is eroded and as it erodes more, the overhanging part of the cliff collapses and the process starts again. This makes the cliff erode inland which can cause many problems for inhabitants of the area on top of the cliff. At The Foreland we find many different kinds of coastal landforms. All of these follow a logic order. At first, the waves hit the rock to form small cracks. Eventually the water enters these small cracks at a very high pressure making the crack expand even more. Eventually this forms a cave which enlarges as the erosion takes place. It can happen that the cave reaches the other side of the headland forming an arch. With time the arch widens and the weight of the arch increases. This weight cannot be supported and so it collapses leaving stacks and stumps (Old Harry and Old Harry's wife). ...read more.

Conclusion

Nowadays, humans use the coast mainly for tourism (fig 3). Coasts are usually beautiful places and attract many tourists during the year. Tourism is the greatest job provider now. The inhabitants of the Swanage Area have built hotels and tourist attractions. This means that money is poured into the area through tourism and this helps to develop many sectors in this area. There is evidence of soft coastal management in this area. This is found all along Swanage bay, on the beach. Groynes (fig 1) have been built to prevent Long Shore Drift and to create beaches. The beach created is the best form of protection between the land and the sea. This also brings benefits to tourism since beaches are created. Behind these groynes are found sea walls (fig 2) where if a storm occurs and large waves hit the area, the houses and roads behind are protected. (fig 1) (fig 2) (fig 3) (fig 4) Luca Galbiati Class 11 Geography http://www.geoexplorer.co.uk/sections/dictionary/dictionaryimages/groyne.jpg http://www.geography.learnontheinternet.co.uk/images/spurn.jpg ...read more.

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