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Bangladesh floods.

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Introduction

Bangladesh is an economically developing country in south East Asia (See map). The capital city of Bangladesh is Dhaka, which has a population of 8.5 million. Bangladesh has a dense population. Its population is 129 million. Its annual growth is 4%. Its inflation is 7%. Its major industries are Jute manufacturing, cotton textiles, food processing, steel, fertilizer's, rice, tea, wheat, sugarcane, potatoes, beef, milk and poultry. Its major trading Partners are Western Europe, US, Hong Kong, Japan, India, China and Singapore. It has an area of 143,998 sq km. Most of Bangladesh's population live on the floodplain and delta of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. 50% of the land lay 15m below sea level. Bangladesh has a monsoon climate, therefore it receives between 1400-1480mm of rain per annum most of which falls between May and October. It has a beautiful land scope with a lot of history and a variety of attractions. It has the longest beach and the largest littoral mangrove forest in the world. Flooding is a common problem, which occurs annually and affects large areas of the country. In 1998 a flood lasted 65 days and destroyed crops, houses, roads and railways and left many people dead. ...read more.

Middle

Interviews taken with the people affected by the floods. These are some of the interviews that were taken with different people that were affected in different ways by the floods. The first interview was with a bus driver and this is some of the things he mentioned in his interview 'It was terrible, I think it was the worst flood I have ever been caught up with, the roads, railways, bridges and even the embankments were swept away and they were all more or less damaged by the floodwaters, I could not believe my eyes when I saw them today'. Another interview that was taken was with an elderly woman who had been living in her village for a fairly long time. These are some of the things she said ' I woke very early this morning and found that my whole village was flooded and the nearby farm where my husband and children work was also flooded, I did not know what to do, there was no where I could go to get away from the flood because the next village was also flooded.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Plan 6: Sink new tube wells 3 In this scheme they would build special wells that would protect water supplies during floods. Farmers will be against this scheme because they will be loosing out on their farmland. Plan 7: Link up to emergency flood warning system 4 In this scheme they would build new communications masks and communication centres, so that villagers would be warned before a flood occurs. The residents will want this scheme because it will mean that they can prepare themselves for a flood. I also think the government will favour this scheme because it will save them a lot of money if they are prepared for a flood; they will have less damage to clear up at the end of a flood. After seeing all of these schemes, it shows that it is difficult to stop the floods when the government do not want to spend a lot of money, however I think that the best scheme would be plan 7 (communication masts) I say this because if the residents and government were warned before a flood happened then they would save a lot of lives and might be able to stop a lot of damage. However, a flood will still cause damage whatever anyone does. ...read more.

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