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Canterbury Field trip.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

CANTERBURY FIELD TRIP By Daniel Weale Canterbury is situated in the south east of England in the middle of Kent. It is connected to all main towns around by main roads (started by the Romans nearly 2000 years before) and is the centre of trade and shopping for the southeast. On the Friday 5th October I took part in a geography field trip to Canterbury. On the day of our field trip the weather was a little over cast with occasional drizzle but not enough to hopefully have put shoppers off. The first day that we went to Canterbury was a market day. The second day that I went to Canterbury to carry out more surveys and to obtain information on shops etc. was a bright but chilly day. Canterbury is steeped in history, the first recorded settlement in Canterbury dates back to the fourth century BC when it was inhabited by the Cantiaci tribe. Since this time Canterbury's owner ship and role as a city has changed many times. The original settlement was built at the lowest point of the river Stour, North and West of Canterbury the ground rises quickly to over 200 feet to a plateau of heavy clay that was covered by the dense forest of blean. To the south and East of the city the ground consist mainly of chalk but is covered by a top layer of fertile soils, here the ground rises less steeply. Canterbury first started out not only as the lowest river crossing point but also as a crossroads leading from the fertile lands to the east and the rest of England. The first big change in control of Canterbury came during the Roman invasion in 54AD when Juleus Ceaser stormed the hill top fort at Bigbury (the areas natural strong point). Historical evidence about Canterbury for the latter stages of the 1 century BC are scarce, but by 75 AD, plans for a civil settlement were beginning to be laid out, these consisting of square framed houses set on a grid of streets. ...read more.

Middle

The late sixteenth century saw religious turmoil come to the country when Henry VII got divorced. By the end of the sixteenth century Canterbury was no long a major city in England and had become merely a market town for east Kent. With the desolation of monasteries and the destruction the pilgrimage trade Canterbury suffered economic hardship. This was slightly tempered by the arrival of Protestant families fleeing persecution on the Continent. Many of these were silk and cloth weavers and soon set up business in the city. By the early seventeenth century these immigrants made up between a fifth and a quarter of Canterbury's population. At the peek of the weaving trade there were over a thousand looms in the city. After the civil war and King Charles execution, the cathedral was abandoned and bishops, dean and chapters were done away with. This saw Canterbury's long existence as the centre of Christianity in England come to an end. Even after the monarchy, archbishop, dean and chapters restoration Canterbury had lost its role as an important place. During the nineteenth century Canterbury's population slowly started to rise. In Canterbury the most important economical trades were in hop-selling, brewing and in public houses. After the First World War Canterbury remained a small market town yet with the new Dean, George Bell, new life was breathed into the city. World War Two hit Canterbury with a shock, especially the devastating bombing in 1942. Only 115 people died in this but well over 800 ancient building were destroyed. After the war the cities governors saw great profit in tourism. Conservation became a big point. Also after the war shops started to pop up in the city and Canterbury started to become a commercial shopping area. Hypothesis Hypothesis 1- I think that there will be a higher density of pedestrians (a larger amount of people) around large low order shops (shops which sell a variety of things) ...read more.

Conclusion

Tourists, purpose shoppers and recreational shoppers. Also I could survey men, women and children to see if any patterns occurred there. Data Collection 1. I could have had a more accurate data collection method. I could have set up a video camera pointing across the street; I could then later check my results against the video to give a more accurate reading. To double check the accuracy of the counter the person timing could also count the number of passing pedestrians or two counters instead of one could be used. 2. Count times could be altered as a large surge of people may occur at certain times and this may fall out of the count times making them inaccurate for the actual data. 3. I could have tried to get the count times closer together so as that it gave a better representation of the population distribution i.e. my last count at 11:53 may have the same people in it as the first count at 10:45, this could mean that there was really only half as many people in Canterbury. My field trip was also slightly bias as Saturday is a very busy shopping day due to schools being off and is slightly unfair to compare to a school day, but unfortunately due to myself having to be at school I couldn't get around this. If I did this work again I would try and study another weekday that was not a market day so as to be able to compare more fairly with the market day. Doing this may also help show more patterns for shopping habits, e.g. more people may shop for one thing on a certain day. I would also try and find day were the weather was roughly the same standard as with the weather conditions being as they were the Friday was not a nice day to be out and about, if the weather was the same on two days it would give a fair representation of data as peoples preference towards going out would not be altered by the conditions ...read more.

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