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Coasts are dynamic interface between land and sea. For a stretch of coastline you have studied explain how coastal process interact with the land to produce a changing system.

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Introduction

Coasts are dynamic interface between land and sea. For a stretch of coastline you have studied explain how coastal process interact with the land to produce a changing system. Coastal environments rarely stay in equilibrium because of the processes interacting with them; a stretch of coastline that is a dynamic system is the Holderness coast. One of the causes of this changing system is related to sea level changes. During glaciations large volumes of water were stored on the land as ice this meant that there was a eustatic fall in sea level. ...read more.

Middle

This changing in the geology has caused many changes to the coastal environment. Glacial till is easily eroded which has caused headlands to form, as there are also bands of harder chalk which means there is a discordant coastline, for example at Flamborough head. The other landforms associated with this are the bays that form in the glacial till areas and the wave cut platforms created by erosion. Erosion is also rapid along this stretch of coastline because of the long fetch the waves have coming from the northeast. Mass-movements of glacial clay are also common on this stretch of coastline, which change the coastal system, as there is an increase in material to transport and deposit as well as creating a rapid coastal retreat. ...read more.

Conclusion

After the sediment is eroded it continues to have an effect on the system as other process interact with it. The sediment is transported along the coast by long shore drift and where there is lower wave energy it is deposited. The littoral cell also effects where the sediment is deposited. On the Holderness coast the deposition has caused a spit to be formed at Spurn point. The spit was created because of the deposition as the coastline changed direction at the river estuary. However even the landforms created do not stay the same as coastal process continue to act on them. This is shown by the erosion of the tip of the spit causing a change in direction at the end of the spit. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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