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Debden Brook Rivers Cousework Analysis and Conclusion

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Introduction

Analysis and Conclusions In this section I intend to analysis my results and state whether my hypothesis were verified (proved correct) or nullified (proved incorrect) I will provide reasons as to why by showing a detailed analysis of actual figures from my graphs. In the second part of this section I will evaluate the results by looking at factors that could have affected the accuracy of my results and conclusions i.e. limitations. I shall look at ways in which my methods might have been improved. I must also look at the Bradshaw model and see if the characteristics of this specific river follow the general trend of his model. Hypothesis 1 - The Width of the River Increases with Distance Downstream This hypothesis was proved correct because figure one shows that the width of the river steadily increases with distance downstream. The water width of the river increased from 0.83m at site 1 (Debden Brook) to 1.95m at site 2 (Debden Brook) and 8.53m at site 3 (The River Roding). This is because streams generally carry more water in their channel as distance from the source increases because water is added to them from tributaries, however there are some exceptions (e.g. ...read more.

Middle

This hypothesis corresponds with the Bradshaw model because fig.4 shows the Cross Sectional Area of the river increasing with distance downstream. Hypothesis 6 - The Wetted Perimeter Increases with Distance Downstream This hypothesis was proved correct because figure three shows that there is a steady increase in the wetted perimeter of the river as you go downstream. The wetted perimeter of the river increased from 1m at site 1 (Debden Brook) to 2m at site 2 (Debden Brook) and 10.94m at site 3 (The River Roding). This is because of greater downwards (vertical) and sideways (lateral) erosion due to increased water velocity, discharge and load,resulting in more abrasion due to traction and saltation as well as hydraulic action. This hypothesis corresponds with the Bradshaw model because fig.3 shows the Wetted Perimeter of the river increasing with distance downstream. Hypothesis 7 - The Discharge of the River Increases with Distance Downstream This hypothesis was proved correct because figure eight shows that there is a rapid increase in the discharge of the river as you go downstream. The discharge of the river increased from 0.53 at site 1 (Debden Brook) ...read more.

Conclusion

- Our method of collection and results will only reflect a particular river at a given time when the readings were taken and therefore could not necessarily be applied to other rivers. An example would be the river Thames which follows the general trend of most rivers and the Bradshaw model, whereas in contrast the River Mersey doesn't follow this general trend and regularity due to urbanisation. Changing factors such as weather conditions as well as static factors such as the type of underlying soil and geology and slope, mean that our data could not be taken as representing the usual behaviour of other rivers. Glossary: Traction - This is when the force of the water simply rolls large rocks along the riverbed. The river usually only has this much force in times of flood. Saltation - Little pieces of gravel and sand bounce along the riverbed in a series of short hops as the river picks them up then drops them again because they are not light enough to be kept afloat. Hydraulic action - This is when the water simply hits part of the riverbank so hard it sweeps it away. Abrasion - A wearing of away of material by friction (the river walls and bed in this case). ...read more.

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4 star(s)

Excellent integration of data, theory and terminology throughout the analysis. More explicit and detailed linkages BETWEEN the different factors and measurements are needed for a higher rating- eg. how does velocity link to discharge and rate of erosion? Which then links to x-sectional area. Very good variety of limitations, with some extended explanation of how these issues may affect the results. To gain extra marks here - go a stage further to consider that these possible errors and therefore inaccurate results may therefore lead to incorrect conclusions for each hypothesis.

Marked by teacher Katie Price 29/03/2013

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