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Dharavi Slum in Mumbai

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Introduction

Dharavi Slum in Mumbai - Slumdog Millionaire The slum in Dharvi gives a general impression of a highly poor quality of life, a place where those who dwell within are unable to succeed past the limited microeconomic system in place within the slum, be this trade of pottery, a key trade1, or that of a more illegal nature - alike that of drug trade and prostitution. Conditions within the slum are of an extremely poor nature, the high population density alone a major issue, with over one million inhabitants living in the cramped five hundred and fifty acre sprawl of built upon land. ...read more.

Middle

typical quality of life that one who resides in any slum world over will experience, apart from perhaps one key element to the Dharavi slum that differs from many others; the large number of inner slum jobs. There is a strong industry of plastic recycling, leather tanning and pottery within the slum itself, with jobs in any of these sectors being available consistently. However he who works in these areas earns little money, with the average worker's pay being only that of two dollars per day. This low income is not due to the worker being taken advantage of however, it is due primarily to the western world's exploitation of cheap goods. ...read more.

Conclusion

Named the Dharavi Re-Development Project it is a two and a half billion dollar project to improve the lives of slum dwellers and recuperate the billions of dollars' worth of land inhabited by the social and economic undesirables. Under the plan developers will build a two hundred and twenty five square ft. apartment per each registered family within the Dharavi slum, 87,000 in total. The scheme allows for families to reside in a structurally safe building, equipped with efficient sanitation. Along with this the Indian government have agreed the provision of schooling and other public services we in MEDC's take for granted. 1 Research shows that the pottery and leather tanning industry within the Dhavari slum alone contributes to the tune of $1billion USD to the Indian economy. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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Response to the question

The response starts off fairly strong; there is a strong introduction which outlines broad problems in Dharavi. However, Dharavi can also be classed as a 'slum of hope' as it exhibits numerous aspirational qualities.
However, the response does deteriorate ...

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Response to the question

The response starts off fairly strong; there is a strong introduction which outlines broad problems in Dharavi. However, Dharavi can also be classed as a 'slum of hope' as it exhibits numerous aspirational qualities.
However, the response does deteriorate until the last paragraph. This is because there is a lack of data, for instance 85% of Dharavi is employed (which is a much higher percentage than some inner city areas in the UK), so comparisons could have been included, which would have gained more marks. Again positive information should have been included about Dharavi, which could have been easily done by putting some depth into the pottery industry as it was previously mentioned.
The last paragraph has an excellent response to the question as it contains a topical solution to problems of Dharavi, however, no negative impacts of the rehousing were mentioned (and there are several notable issues). But relevant statistics were mentioned in response to the question.
Overall a more detailed response is definitely necessary to gain higher marks.

Level of analysis

The level of analysis can be deepened by the use of statistics as mentioned above. An even further analysis would have conveyed more insight into the negative and positive qualities of Dharavi and the effects on this on the demographically changing Indian population. In light of this point, the movement of India through the demographic transition model (DTM) and the effects of its transition from a developing country to a NIC could be included, and the strain and drive this puts on population of Dharavi.

Quality of writing

The quality of writing was initially excellent and again at a very high standard at the end. More geographic terminology could have been used in the middle paragraphs to present the candidates points with greater clarity.


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