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During this study trip we also recorded data concerning various aspects that might relate to tourist impact on the dune ecosystem and the Bay.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

SECTION 2 Methodology During this study trip we also recorded data concerning various aspects that might relate to tourist impact on the dune ecosystem and the Bay. These data were all primary and included those aspects listed below. Secondary data was obtained by researching Internet sites. Primary Data Secondary Data Footpath survey Litter survey Car Park survey Traffic survey Photographs Internet research To achieve the Primary Data The group carried out a number of different surveys 1) In assessing tourist impact on the dunes the group chose at random eight different sites along footpaths. At these different sites the group measured the width of the footpath by laying down a meter rule or measuring tape across the path. Subsequent to these measurements, the group then also estimated the amount of vegetation cover within a 5m radius of that point on the path and similarly counted the number of pieces of litter within the same radius. Finally a visual estimate of the distance from the beach was made. 2) In assessing the impact of tourism within the Bay, the group moved to the entrance of the dunes and its car park to carry out a car park survey, simply by counting how many cars were in the car park. 3) A traffic survey was also planned, but on the day little traffic was present and so this survey was not conducted. 4) The group also took time to take several photographs of tourist impact on the village. (unfortunately I have none to present) To achieve the Secondary Data The objective of the Internet research was to find supporting data on the extent and effects of tourism in the area. Sites visited included: www.OxwichBay.co.uk http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/southwest/nature/thingstodo/walks/pages/oxwich1.shtml http://www.swansea-gower.co.uk/bays/oxwichbay.htm http://www.enjoygower.com/beaches/beaches12.cfm http://www.ccw.gov.uk/ http://www.gower-sos.com/ http://www.countryside.gov.uk/aonb/40_gower02.htm Survey Results The results obtained during the site surveys are given in Tables 2:1 and 2:2 below. Footpath Site Approximate location from beach (m) Footpath width (m) ...read more.

Middle

. Results of management techniques appraisal The diagram illustrates the management techniques that came out of the brainstorm. Cost Benefit Analysis - Management Techniques Many people, for example businesses and government departments, use a cost benefit analysis. Geographers commonly use this technique; it is used below for comparing different ways of management in the Reserve at Oxwich Bay. Cost and benefits are considered in the analysis. Benefits are not purely financial, but are also considered environmentally or even socially. A scheme mark was estimated on a scale of 1 to 10 against expected relative cost and benefit. A high mark was given for the lowest cost and for the maximum benefit. Subsequently for each management technique the score was added for cost and benefit, the higher the total score then the "better" the technique i.e. it has more benefit and less cost. Cost Benefit Analysis -Dune Management Techniques Table 3:1 Analysis of Results The management techniques are discussed in the order of maximum cost benefit as shown in the table of results, Table 3:1, above. The thought process in arriving at the ratings is shown below for each technique. Signs * Comes out top with cost benefit rating of 15, equal with fences. * Very useful because they inform people generally about the dunes and their importance. * Usually placed at entrance or in the slacks for maximum effect at access points.. * Provide useful information about the history and nature of the ecosystem in the dunes and its sensitivity, to alert people to avoid damage. * Tells people how and where they can or cannot walk and routes i.e. a map of footpaths and access times. * People can be receptive to signs and information. * Very sustainable, they can last a long time. BUT: * Some people do not read them or will ignore their instructions. * Cannot be placed everywhere where people enter the dunes. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Investigate further about original ideas on how to preserve the dunes. Considering the hypothesis I have come to the conclusion that it is blatantly wrong. I think this because there is just not enough evidence to back up this hypothesis. Further data gathering at different times of the year however could alter this view. It is easy to disagree, because of many things. One could say that Oxwich Bay is a vast expanse of land and that the amount of tourists visiting the Bay could not affect it at all. I think this because at the time of our visit, it was not peak season, and there was no one in the Bay at all. However you could say that there is a conflict at Oxwich Bay that occurs because tourists are clearly walking around the dunes, but there is no major conflict that could escalate into the environmental collapse of the dunes. With this in mind one could say that maybe the Bay is only affected during peak season when more people are inclined to use the bay thus, meaning if most plants are damaged in this time there is plenty of time for plants such as marram grass to re-grow. One can see how the conflict could be happening with the extent of the people involved with the dunes who have completely different opinions and development ideas for the dunes. The environmentalist factions, whilst only wanting to keep the dunes intact, try to keep the dunes isolated for users and tourists. There is a great contradiction with the environmentalist's protection of the bay because the managers want to grant proper controlled access to the dunes for all interests. Sustainability of the management is also at issue. Residents in the area are neutral, only keeping the best welfare of the dunes at heart and benefiting from the beauty of the area. The dunes may be at other more significant risk, from sand depletion caused by dredging offshore. ...read more.

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