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Easedale and Glacial Features

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Introduction

Geography Coursework "Easedale & Glacial Features" Natasha Kappella Windermere St Annes Table of Contents Introduction & Aims................................................... pg 3 Data Collection: Primary Resources.............................. pg 4 Secondary Resources........................... pg 5 Data Presentation & Analysis: Field sketches.......................................... pg 6-10 Rose diagram (striation orientation)..................pg 6a Annotated photos....................................... pg 11-12 Rose diagrams (stone orientation).....................pg 13 Bar chart of power's scale rocks..................... pg 10 Cross section, labelled with glacial landforms..... pg 14 Memory map, labelled with glacial landforms..... pg 14 Conclusion.................................................................. pg 15 Evaluation.................................................................. pg 15 Bibliography............................................................... pg 15 Introduction and Aims On Monday June 5th 2006, the geography class of Windermere St Annes pursued their research of glaciation and its effects on landscapes by studying Easedale Valley; so the aim of the field trip was to see if glaciation had affected the landscape of Easedale. The hypothesis that I devised is: "The effect of glaciation has significantly impacted on Easedale's current landscape". I used a series of techniques such as field sketching, observing, measuring striations, taking photographs and sorting pebbles into classes according to Power's Scale, to see if my hypothesis was true or false. I spent the day gathering primary research and seeing how my past knowledge can fit and apply to my observations. ...read more.

Middle

Field Sketch 2: Corrie (pg 7) The sketch shows a large cliff-like back wall which gently slopes down into the tarn. On the back wall are masses off hummocky moraine (see field sketch 4 of Hummocky Moraine, pg 9), which are gentle rolling hills which could have been shaped by a glacier moving down the land while plucking large amounts of the rock and earth with it. The sketch also shows a couple of columns of gathered earth and rock, this could be suggesting they're ar�tes which are signs of medial moraine deposited by two glaciers that have joined together (while still flowing down the hill). The tarn implies its large water quantity could have only come from something as vast as a melted glacier. At the base of the tarn is a ridge of earth embedded with unsorted rocks- resembling a corrie lip embedded with till! All these features tied in together strongly propose they were sculpted and formed by glaciation. My observations most definitely support that my sketch of the scene is a corrie, and the ridge at the base of the tarn is a corrie lip. Field Sketch 3: Corrie Lip Till (pg 8) ...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation The main purpose of the study was to see how glaciation has impacted and sculpted the landscapes of the current day; this was successfully shown through the landscape of Easedale. However, only studying Easedale has limited my knowledge of how current landscapes have been sculpted by glaciation. To resolve this problem, I'd like to study another landscape that has suggestibly been influenced by glaciation so that I can compare the two. On the excursion at Easedale, our potential information gathered was limited due to the lack of available time. The field sketches were rushed, as were good angles for photographs. A way to avoid this problem is to extend the Easedale study to two or three days further, so that each aspect of the excursion could be more focussed on. Another degrade of the excursion was the measured striations- only one set of data was collected. To improve the accuracy and reliability of this data, other striations on different rocks should be measured, so that the range of information gathered is broader. Another method I could carry out to improve my investigation is to compare glaciated features to other forms of landscape influences such as a river. This would support my hypothesis further as it would be cancelling out any other possibilities that could have formed the landscape. ...read more.

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