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Energy assessment for Japan

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Introduction

Assessment 1 Energy and the Environment Solar energy: Solar energy have no moving parts to wear out. It uses no fossil fuels and don't need maintenance. But it isn't efficient in places where people rarely have sun. Britain is a good example, it only sees about three months of sun each year. That's hardly enough to make solar power pack a punch. There is no pollution from solar cells, and sunlight is free. However, the solar cells are expensive and do not produce enough power. Photovoltaic (solar) cells would be excellent to power a car. However, photovoltaic cells are not efficient enough to power a family car. It doesn't work at night. They're also very expensive to build. Solar cells cost a great deal compared to the amount of electricity they'll produce in their lifetime. Can be unreliable unless you're in a very sunny climate. Solar station In California, the Solar One power station uses the Sun's heat to make steam, and drive a generator to make electricity. It was made in California because it a country that sees plenty of sunlight to really made solar energy kick in. Solar One was very expensive to build, but as fossil fuels run out and become more expensive, solar power stations may become a better option. Wind energy Wind turbines are kinder to the environment than other power schemes. ...read more.

Middle

It was built in 1966. A major drawback of tidal power stations is that they can only generate when the tide is flowing in or out - in other words, only for 10 hours each day. However, tides are totally predictable, so we can plan to have other power stations generating at those times when the tidal station is out of action. Once you've built the dam, tidal power is free. Again this also produces no greenhouse gases or other waste. It also doesn't need any fuel, it produces electricity reliably, it's not expensive to maintain, and the tides are totally predictable. However, they're very expensive to build. Also affects a very wide area - the environment is changed for many miles upstream and downstream. Many birds rely on the tide uncovering the mud flats so that they can feed. As well it only provides power for around 10 hours each day, when the tide is actually moving in or out. And there are very few suitable sites for tidal power stations. Wave: Ocean waves are caused by the wind as it blows across the sea. Waves are a powerful source of energy. The problem is that it's not easy to harness this energy and convert it into electricity in large amounts. And so make wave power stations are rare. Once it's made the energy is free - no fuel needed, no waste produced like the others. ...read more.

Conclusion

And then the waste after can be used as compost. Demand for electrical power changes throughout the day. For example, when a popular TV programme finishes, a huge number of people go out to the kitchen to put the kettle on, causing a sudden peak in demand. If power stations don't generate more power immediately, there'll be power cuts around the country - traffic lights will go out, causing accidents, and all sorts of other trouble will occur. The problem is that most of our power is generated by fossil fuel power stations, which take half an hour or so to crank themselves up to full power. Nuclear power stations take much longer. They need something that can go from nothing to full power immediately, and keep them supplied for around half an hour until the other power stations catch up. Pumped storage reservoirs are the answer I've chosen. Without some means of storing energy for quick release, we'd be in trouble. It has little effect on the landscape and makes no pollution or waste. It's expensive to build but the energy it makes is free. To be able to use it again you need to pump more water. It's also good because Japan has a lot of mountains to construct one And the main source of energy is nuclear power. It may be risky but it's everything Japan wanted. It makes no pollution, it's cheap and it's not likely to make people lose there jobs because it's not renewable. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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