• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain with examples why some regions and countries are zones that experience multiple hazards

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explain with examples why some regions and countries are zones that experience multiple hazards A hazard is a natural event that presents a risk to people, plants, property or animals. A hazard is when extreme natural events or processes occur in an area of human settlement and threatens loss of life and damage to existing constructed resources and infrastructures. A hazard only occurs when it becomes online to create a potential disaster. A multiple hazard is when an area is exposed to more than one hazard, so several natural hazards can be caused by the same natural event for example heavy storms causing flooding which also causes landslides to occur. There are three main types of hazard: tectonic, which includes hazards such as landslides, rockfalls, avalanches and soil erosion. Geomorphic includes earthquakes and volcanoes and climatic hazards are things like floods, drought, tornados and hurricanes. Some regions and countries may experience multiple hazards due to three main reasons which are human reason, physical interdependence and bad luck. I am going to argue that it is just pure bad luck that these countries tend to suffer all the hazards. I will also however look if the other two affect it and by how much as well. ...read more.

Middle

wouldn't have tsunamis and then we wouldn't have this type of hazard, a tsunami is a interdependent on either a volcano or earthquake. Also there is the factor of human life, if there was no people or property to consider how would we class it as a hazard, we wouldn't be able to, if it had caused no harm it would have just stayed as an event, it is the whole just people being involved and present in an area which causes it to be a hazard. Los Angeles with 13 million inhabitants has become known as 'hazard city'. Not only does the San Andreas fault which crosses southern California create a conservative margin, but LA was built across numerous transform faults causing great earthquakes. The 1994 earthquake registered 6.4 on the Richter Scale killed 60 people and over 500 000 houses were left without power. Pacific ocean coastlines are particularly prone to tsunamis generated by submarine earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The coastal fringes of Malibu to Redondo Beach are under the greatest threat. A sizeable tsunami generated by the sudden release of locked undersea faults could strike Los Angeles beaches with virtually no warning. ...read more.

Conclusion

Farming the soil of an active volcano is inherently risky. For poorer residents, however, it is often the only livelihood available. Mayon's eruption in 1993 killed 75 people - all of them tomato farmers in the Bonga Valley, one of the ravines declared off-limits by the government. Today nearly 20,000 locals live and farm within Mayon's Permanent Danger Zone. Humans put themselves at risk by living to close to it. If no civilisation was present near them, so when they do erupt nothing was damaged or hurt it couldn't really be classed as a hazard but as an event. Only the presence of people living there and getting injured and loosing their houses and crops etc make it the hazard. I feel that the majority of hazards are caused due to the presence of two plates meeting and causing formation of such things like earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes etc. Without regions and countries being present in these areas the hazards wouldn't occur. Hazards tend to lead on from one thing to another as in an earthquake can cause tsunamis and warm hot weather may cause drought and fires. I have found that it is generally bad luck, coincidence and physical interdependence that mainly cause regions to have multiple hazards but also human factors play apart as without them it couldn't be classed as a hazard. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Physical Geography section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Physical Geography essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why do similar kinds of hazards have different impacts in different places?

    5 star(s)

    The country is one of the most densely populated countries in the world, and also one of the poorest. The local people scratch out a living primarily on the farming of jute and other agriculture products that grow on this prime region.

  2. Geography- Whistable Coast Project

    Limited time was spent on site due to the need to return to school. As a consequence only a small amount of data could be collected making results limited. The day was a weekday and this meant that fewer people were out as most were at work.

  1. The Long Term Effects of Volcanic Eruptions

    Clouds play an important role in keeping the Earth cool by reflecting sunlight, but they can also serve as blankets to trap warmth. This, along with the large amount of dust particles in the atmosphere, caused global temperatures to fall by approximately 1.2 degrees Celsius.

  2. Was it the human or natural causes that caused the 1998 floods in bangladesh?

    Dr: well huge damage has been made to the embankments- a total of 4,528 km, and as known the embankments take a lot of money to build and replace them, there will be a huge amount of money borrowed. NC: have there been a lot of public facilities damaged as well?

  1. Cause and effect of the Japanese tsunami

    * Oil, Gas and Coal Oil refineries were set on fire by the earthquake. An analyst estimates that consumption of various types of oil may increase by as much as 300,000 barrels per day, as back-up power plants burning

  2. Physical Geography Earth revision notes

    Responses to global warming Gas ? Carbon dioxide Sources ? burning fossil fuels , car exhausts , deforestation , burning wood Individual responses ? walking / cycling , conserving energy , paying a carbon offset , promoting public transport , congestion charging National responses ; tougher MOT tests , congestion

  1. Revision notes - the Earth, causes and effects of Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

    L?Aquila, Italy 2. Europe 3. 100miles northeast of Rome What: 1. Third biggest earthquake in the region 2. Richter Scale: 6.3 3. Death toll: 300 4. 15,000 buildings off limits Why: 1. On Eurasian and African tectonic plate boundaries 2.

  2. Earthquakes and volcanoes research

    Scientists cannot accurately predict the exact location of an earthquake but after studying seismic activates, they can use this information to monitor areas where many earthquakes might happen. Tiltmeter A tiltmeter is an instrument used by geologist to measure the changing slope of a landscape.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work