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Explore the effects of tourism in a honeypot and test the following hypothesis: Tourists cause problems at honeypots and their needs and desires conflict with those of other people.

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Introduction

Introduction The purpose of this investigation is to explore the effects of tourism in a honeypot and test the following hypothesis: Tourists cause problems at honeypots and their needs and desires conflict with those of other people. The honeypot I have decided to study is Castleton village and the area surrounding it. Castleton is one of the many honeypots in the peak district national park. I hope to prove during this investigation that tourism can have both positive and negative effects on the local environment, amenities, industry and population. The sequence of this investigation This investigation relates to the work in the GCSE Specification about the impact of tourism in National Parks, conflicts of interest between tourists and other groups and the problems that tourist can cause in honeypots. In order to achieve the aims of this investigation and to test the hypothesis, the following activities were carried out: 1. An environmental survey 2. A traffic flow survey 3. A survey of facilities on Castleton's main street The data from these surveys is presented and analysed in separate section of this investigation file. An evaluation of the work will conclude this investigation. What is Tourism? Tourism is defined by Webster's dictionary as, 'the practice of traveling for recreation.' Another more concise definition is "Leisure time activity generally defined as involving an overnight stay or more, away from home." ...read more.

Middle

* House prices for locals too expencive to buy on wages they can earn locally Effects on the enviroment Visual impact People who come to visit see beautiful old cottages and rural villages landscapes don't want to see other walkers litter ect Another negative visual impact is the amount of cars scattered around the village blocking out the natural beauty Noise pollution Noise pollution from cars and other transport can cause increased aggravation to the local residents and wildlife. So when you come away on holiday, you have to remember that people live there and they don't want sleepless nights because of the increase in noise pollution. Acid rain kills plants which is caused by traffic pollution. There is seasonal unemployment as most jobs are limited to the one season Traditional ways of life have changed Impact on farming park across gates block roads Conflicts The second major conflict that occurs in Castleton is between tourists themselves. This is because there are many different groups of tourists who want different things from Castleton. For example the walkers and some other groups want to see a quiet countryside. Therefore, they will not like the fact that Castleton is a busy honeypot However, the county council is under pressure to allow further development because of the demand for homes and second holiday homes. So this is causing everywhere to be over developed increasing the likelihood of a more negative visual impact. ...read more.

Conclusion

From here you glide quietly through the workings of a 200 year old lead mine. The mine opens into a network of natural caverns and underground rivers. 200 meters below the surface of the hill is a cavern containing the Bottomless Pita huge subterranean lake. This is quite an unusual tourist attraction as it combines history, geology and geography with an underground boat trip which is very rare. So it makes it popular with ordinary tourists as well as with schools for educational trips. Treak Cliff Cavern Treak Cliff cavern is home to Blue John Stone, a rare form of Fluorite with beautiful colours. Popular as an ornamental stone and mined for 300 years it also has many Stalactites, Stalagmites, Rocks Minerals and Fossils. People of all ages can enjoy a visit to Treak Cliff Cavern. Special events are held at certain times during the year. Polish Your Own Blue John Stone is an activity usually available during most school holidays where you select, prepare and polish a slice of Blue John Stone to take home. This encourages schools as well as families to visit the caverns. Blue john stone is found nowhere in the world but amongst the rocks of Treak Cliff Hill, Castleton The origin of the name 'Blue John' is thought to have come from the French 'bleu et jaune', meaning 'blue and yellow'. Treak Cliff Cavern is one of only two working Blue John Stone mines in the world and extracts approximately 1.5 tons per two years. The stone is now used for small decorative objects and jewellery. ...read more.

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