• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17

GCSE Geography

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction Druridge bay is located 47miles from Berwick, 10miles from Morpeth, 23.6miles from Newcastle. I have been asked to answer three questions about the sand dunes at druridge bay and the management of the park. Druridge Bay Country Park includes three miles of beautiful beach and sand dunes, as well as a 100 acre lake surrounded by woods and meadows. There is a wide variety in the landscape. The park concedes of beach land woodlands and a lake. The bay its self is about 5 miles long and the golden sands are preserved in areas that are near small villages. Whereas in certain areas the beach is left for man to trample all over it and destroy its natural beauty. This beach in the north-east is a gem of the east coast with its rolling dunes slowly decaying due to human activity. In this piece of work I will be answering three key questions that concern the welfare of the beach. Key Question one "how do the dunes at druridge bay compare with a model sand dune" Introduction In this key question I am going to compare a model sand dune with the dunes a Druridge bay. I will also be comparing the vegetation found on the dunes at Druridge bay and what I should be expected to find on a model sand dune. The model sand dune consists of an embryo dune followed by a yellow dune followed by a semi-fixed dune followed by a fixed dune. ...read more.

Middle

the path at this stage has average lateral and vertical x-section to it. The next measurement of the path is 825cm wide the widest part of the whole path. Its depth is 198cm. the path has a lot of vertical erosion and a lot of lateral at this stage with drops of 96cm. at this point the path is widening this is due to people walking onto the beach in the direction of their travel. This part of the path is still quite wide but very sallow. 600cm wide and a maximum depth of 45cm. the path here has a lot of lateral erosion. The path is narrowing again. The path at this stage is much narrower than before, 300cm wide but is much deeper going down to 118cm. there is a lot of vertical erosion on the sides of the path this is because the sand is much softer. The path at this stage is getting smaller at 275cm but still fairly deep at 99cm. there is a lot of vertical erosion still. Here the path stays the same width at 275cm but gets sallower at 54cm deep. Here there is not much erosion compared to the rest of the stages and the path is narrowing. Here the path stays the same at 275 but even more depth has gone at 23cm deep. The path for some reason probably human erosion has got wider at this stage. The path width is 425cm and a depth of 24cm. ...read more.

Conclusion

Where as you can see people don't know where to walk destroying the dunes in the process. Boardwalk? In this picture I would want to have those Tank traps to protect the dunes and that's why there is only the one dune. (Pictured) Miss Shipley In this picture I would encourage a notice to be placed on the side of the path to tell people to keep off the dunes and stay on the path itself and add a boardwalk. To stop erosion. Conclusion There are many good things about the managed site but some minor things that could be added. The boardwalks are a very good idea showing people where to walk so they don't damage the sand dunes. The tank traps I feel save the dunes at that managed part of the dunes which will keep the dunes there for along time. Whereas at the unmanaged site there is nothing protecting the dunes so they are gradually moving back and the sea is coming further up the beach if some sort of protection was put into place the dunes would look more like the model dune. At both sites I think that they should place a notice at the start and end of the beach so people no what they are doing walking on the sand dune and that will encourage some concerned people to walk on the boardwalk saving the dunes. I would suggest there to be more bins at the unmanaged site there's nothing more than off putting than dog bags dotted about and rubbish lying everywhere. Overall the unmanaged site needs to be sorted out or it will loss all its natural beauty. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Physical Geography section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Physical Geography essays

  1. To what extent should Walton-on-the-naze be protected from the sea?

    out cheaper to build sea defences rather than paying compensation for every property that is lost to the sea. Also if further protection is not invested than Walton faces the possibility of becoming an island. What could happen is that the part of Walton that is not protected will be

  2. Cliff erosion in East Sussex - the processes, problems and solutions.

    costs of �5,000 per year for 100m of curved sea wall defences. A vertical sea wall has a cheaper installment but very high maintenance costs and is less effective as a form of coastal protection. * Gabions: Gabions are free-draining walls constructed by filling large baskets with broken stone.

  1. An Investigation Into Kingston Area Shopping Centres and Their Patterns of Use

    Semi Average Regression Line It too is an objective rather than subjective indicator, unlike the best fit line which is trusted much less than the Semi Average Regression line. Finding the 3 averages in which the coordinates will lie on is difficult to plot on a tight axis.

  2. GCSE Geography Coursework: Strand 4 - Interpertation of Data

    This is because River Calder and River Wyre confluence at this point. River Wyre is the dominant tributary of the River Calder, hence why it has added the greatest volumes of water. (3) Velocity: According to the Bradshaw Model, the velocity of the water is expected to increase moving downstream from the source.

  1. GCSE Geography Coursework: Strand 5 - Evaluation of Data

    day in winter, where the velocity in the upper and lower-course is constant (i.e. no rain) as, then, there is a better chance of obtaining more accurate results. I will also try to compare my results with that of a similar river which does not have any sources of abstraction,

  2. Investigationg Eco-systems At Sand Dunes

    Each girl will carry this out on at least one dune. When we get back to the lab, we will put most of our soil sample into a basin, keeping a small amount to test for pH value. We will weigh the soil in the basin, dried it out in a pre-heated oven (110�C)

  1. Between Prawle point and Start Bay

    The sea wall works by pushing the wave back on itself therefore breaking the impact of the wave and the energy it carries, Gabions work similar to rip rap meaning the also break up the energy of the wave and reduce its impact in the collision.

  2. Physical Geography Earth revision notes

    the magma moving up * You might get gases * The water temperature increases * A volcanoes shape changes . Tilt meters measure the change , so do geometers . * Use satellites to measure movement * Look at past eruptions 2010 April eruption Primary Effects ? explosions caused electrical

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work