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GCSE OCR Geography Avery Hill Coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Bijesh Patel Geography Coursework 10T2 Mr Jones HYPOTHESIS - The land use changes across an escarpment, this change is determined by both physical/natural and human factor. Three main Questions that I will be answering are: How do physical and natural factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? How do human factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? And which factor I consider to be most important and why? Contents Three questions I will be answering Introduction Method Sites In Coombe Hill Where is Coombe Hill/Coombe Hill Area Map What is a Chalk Escarpment? Maps Graphs How do physical and natural factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? How do human factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? And which factor I consider to be most important and why? Evaluation Three main Questions that I will be answering are: How do physical and natural factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? How do human factors help determine the land use of an escarpment? And which factor I consider to be most important and why? INTRODUCTION On Thursday 12th June 2008, we went to Coombe Hill, which is part of the Chiltern Hills Range, in Buckinghamshire, to study the Chalk Escarpment, how the land is used and is affected by human and physical factors. A Chalk Escarpment is made of Chalk, a sedimentary rock; the layers were tilted by the movement of the Earth and it consists of three elements: a dip slope, a crest and the scarp. ...read more.

Middle

MAPS In this coursework, I will be producing two A3 maps. These two maps will show two different factors, which are vital for answering the three main questions. The 1st map will be a Land Use map, this is a very important map as it shows the different types of land uses around the Coombe Hill area e.g. Recreational Use, such as Golf Courses. Other uses for land could be Residential for building homes, or farming and grazing. This map will also point out areas which are suitable for different land uses, such as houses would only be built on flat land, houses built on steep land would be difficult to build. Also, a golf course is also built on flat land, therefore making it a Recreational Land Use. The 2nd A3 Map I will be producing is a Soil Type Map, which shows the different types of Soil in the Coombe Hill Area. In each of the sites, we went to the soil type differed. Some of the sites had clay, which is fertile, in the soil; this made the sites suitable for farming. Chalk is a common rock in Coombe Hill, it is scattered all over the place, it is infertile, and therefore not many crops can be grown on sites with chalk. On the soil type map I will be outlining the route we took, with three different soil types in the map: Chalk, Clay and Chalk and Flint. LAND USE MAP ROCK TYPE MAP GRAPHS Along with maps, I will be producing three graphs which I will use to compare three different factors, ...read more.

Conclusion

The soil types differ throughout coombe hill and different rocks are resistant to erosion and have different uses. The soil types determines the land use the most because the soil is considered to be the roots of the land, plants can grow if they are enough nutrients, this is an example of how the soil determines the land use, and this in my opinion is the most important factor. EVALUATION I'm going to evaluate the project, by stating what went well during the project, and what I could have done to improve. Things that went well were that I collect large amounts of information, such as collecting samples of soil, plants and any other vegetation. I used the samples in the project, as evidence to describe the sites. I also took photos of each sites, and the environment around them, this again was used as evidence and diagrams. One thing we could have improved in this project is we could have visited another chalk escarpment around the UK. I thought this was essential as we could compare the chalk escarpment with Coombe Hill, to see whether the information was similar. It would have also made our results more accurate and precise, making it more reliable. To conclude, overall I believe that I answered the three key questions, using all the information gathered. I gathered ample data to prove the hypothesis- The land use changes across an escarpment, this change is determined by both physical/natural and human factor. It also gave me an insight on what chalk escarpments are, how they are formed and what physical/human factors determine the land use of the escarpment. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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