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Geography Kenya coursework - Part 2

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Part 2 In this section I will show a link between the vegetation, climate and animals in the Savanna ecosystem. The Savanna grasslands in Kenya represent a transition zone between rainforests and hot deserts. Vegetation has had to adapt to a tropical continental climate. The climate in Kenya is a tropical continental climate, and has two distinct seasons: * A very warm & dry season - similar to a desert climate * A hot & wet season - similar to a rainforest Graph 3 is a climate graph for Kenya. It can clearly be seen on this graph that there is are distinct 'wet' & 'dry' seasons. It can be seen from the graph that in April and May it is a wet season. In May rainfall is 149mm and the temperature is 29 degrees Celsius . In April rainfall is 108mm and the temperature is 31 degrees Celsius. It can also be seen that in October and November it is a relatively wet season. ...read more.


tourists will be attracted to the Savanna more so than in the wet months (April to May and October to November). This is because in the wet months if may be more difficult to go on a Safari as wet conditions may prove it incapable to travel to certain places. Flash floods could also cause a problem by turning roads into streams and generally flooding the area. In my opinion tourists would be attracted to the coast in the wet season. This is because attractions for tourists are easily accessible at the coast and they do not need to worry about flash floods as much if they are not travelling anywhere. The hot weather would also dry up a lot of the rain very quickly on the coast whereas on safari's it is full of rigid landscape. Vegetation in Kenya mostly consists of grasslands and trees. In particular the Acacia and Baobab trees. Generally, vegetation changes from being lifeless in the dry season to being full of life in the wet season. ...read more.


and the non-living (air, rocks, water, soil) in an environment. The Savanna ecosystem in particular is very fragile, if any part of it is changed or affected by something it can have bad effects on the whole ecosystem. An example of this is if the Acacia trees are removed, the giraffe will result to eating the Baobab Trees. This will make less food for the Elephants and the Giraffes, decreasing population of both animals because of starvation. Because of the decreased amount of Elephants and Giraffes the Leopard and Lions will decrease in population and result in eating more Impala's Elephants and Giraffes. The reason I mentioned the removal of Acacia Trees as an example, is because this is actually happening in Kenya today. Trees are being cut down for various things, and people are not taking into consideration what it is doing to the ecosystem when they do this. Acacia Trees are chopped down for various reasons: * For Roads/Tracks * To create Boats * To clear areas for hotels/lodges * As building materials for construction, for the hotels/lodges * Furniture (locally made) * Firewood All of these reasons show that the Acacia tree is being removed. ...read more.

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