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Global Inequealities

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Introduction

1 GLOBAL INEQUALITIES ASSESSMENT 2 EAST TIMOR 3 Introduction to the Country: Definition Population the people who inhabit a territory or state 1,108,777 GDP per Capita The total GDP of the country divided by its population US$366 Birth Rate Number of births per 1000 of the population 26.52 Death Rate Number of deaths per 1000 of the population 6.02 Infant Mortality Out of 1000 births this amount dies 89 Life expectancy The average age that a person will die in the country 55.5 years H.D.I A number made to calculate whether or not a country is developed 0.426 Climate The seasons and average temperature of a country Tropical Sex Ratio The number of men there are per woman 1.03 men Literacy Rate The percentage of the population that can read 50.1% East Timor is the newest nation in the whole world so far, just over 6 years old. It established its independence in 1999 after a near 400 year colonization of Portugal from which the country freed itself in 1975. However, that next year, Indonesia took over the country and, during their reign, nearly 300,000 Timorese lost their lives. On September 20th 1999, the peacekeeping troops of the International Force for East Timor (INTERFET) deployed into the country and liberated it from the Indonesians. However, the country itself was not recognized globally an independent state until 22nd May 2002. ...read more.

Middle

They do not yet face a widespread epidemic of HIV/AIDS, but few people are aware of the threat it poses and fewer still know how to prevent it. People suffer from poor health partly because they cannot get ready access to health services. But water supplies and sanitation are also deficient: half the population does not have access to safe drinking water, and 60% do not have adequate sanitation"7 Health is given to East Timor by a network of 64 community health centers, 88 health posts and 117 mobile clinics. Out of these, maybe 150 are working and the number of qualified doctors is quite limited. There are plans for there to be 21 doctors on call through the districts. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) took control of this hospital in Baucau, Dili, but found that much of the equipment was damaged or missing. Since then, the hospital has been re-built and rehabilitated and now functions at near 100%. 8 * Access To Shelter: After the liberation of East Timor in 1999, tens of thousands were left homeless. The UN set up what are called IDP camps, the ones in the picture is just a small part of one IDP camp. The camps are located in the parks, or other large areas of space that are not being used. At the beginning there were 50 camps, today only 22 remain. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are several government and non-government funded programs that are there to help these people, but on some occasions, these people do not want help. Another issue is the limited areas where people can live. Australia has a large desert in its center so people can only live near the shores. 16 * ACCESS TO SAFE WATER: 97% of the Australian population have complete access to safe water. 90 per cent of rainfall is directly evaporated back to the atmosphere or used by plants-only 10 per cent runs off to rivers and streams or recharges groundwater aquifers. As Australia is extremely prone to drought, Australia has nearly 500 large dams which can hold up to 40 000 giga liters. 40 000 000 000 LITERS per dam. 17 * Australia- east-Timor relations CONCLUSION: Education: In Australia, the medium number of years at school is about 16 years, while many of East Timor's school children drop out after a few years and hardly any do the whole 6-12 grade education. Access to food Health Access to shelter access to safe water 1 http://www.appliedlanguage.com 2 http://www.oxfam.org.au 3 http://www.lonelyplanet.com All statistics taken from the UNDP Human Development Report 4 UNDP HUMAN DEVELOPMENT REPORT (both the quote and the statistics of the graph) 5 http://www.etan.org 6 http://cache.daylife.com 7 UNDP Human Development Report 8 http://findarticles.com 9 Final Statistical Abstract: Timor-Leste Survey of Living Standards 2007 10 http://www.etan.org/issues/tsea/budget.jpg 11 http://www.redsea.com.au 12 http://images.apple.com Statistics taken from http://www.nationmaster.com 13 http://blog.wired.com 14 http://www.innovationaustralia.net/ 15 http://www.nsri.org.au/ 16 http://i.treehugger.com/ 17 http://www.water.gov.au ?? ?? ?? ?? Caitlin Holford 10Q Geography 18/11/08 - 1 - ...read more.

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