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Henistbury Head

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Introduction

Henistbury Head By Billy Kensit Henistbury Head is a headland on the coast of Bournemouth in England. It was made a SSSI (a site of special scientific interest) and contains an ancient Iron Age fortification and settlement called the Double Dykes. In this essay I will be explaining to you the problems that Henistbury Head encounters and the possible solutions. It attracts over 1 million visitors a year, who come to see the wide variety of exotic animals that come to Henistbury Head to breed, these exotic animals include: the Dartford Warbler, the Cetti's Warbler, the Song Thrush, the Skylark, the Kestrel, the Barn Owl, the Little Owl, the Otter, the Water Vole, Galloway Cattle, the Common Blue Butterfly, the Rabbit, Black- headed Gull and many more. Without this habitat to live in a lot of the local animals would die out because they rely on the woodland and grassland to live in and to find their food sources in. ...read more.

Middle

This is a very costly method and the consequences of this would be that the noise and the damage from the construction workers could affect the wildlife and destroy the environment they were trying to protect. The visitors would like to leave the beach as it and to do this they would provide beach nourishment to the coast to prevent it from being eroded and spoiling it. The effects of this would be that the residents homes would be unprotected. The plants and wildlife live in a delicate environment and the effects of adding anything to the beach could be that it upsets the environmental balance and the plants and wildlife will be either reduced or will relocate themselves. The natural processes that Bournemouth council are trying to protect the Headland against is erosion and longshore drift. Erosion is where acid rain, bird droppings and the sea are eating away at the cliff and headland. ...read more.

Conclusion

The final option is to build a sea wall all the way along the beach at the east end of Henistbury Head (this is a long and thick concrete wall and it will protect the coast, the headland and the residents homes but it could cause the wildlife to leave Henistbury Head). The option that I would choose would be a compromise I would build gabions and groynes and I would continue to provide the beach with nourishment also I would shorten the length of the long groyne therefore allowing more shingle to flow freely. This would be a cost effective method as you do not have to pay a lot for these resources. The reasons I would use this instead of the other methods is because it will please both the residents and the visitors and would be very cheap to accomplice. ...read more.

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