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How has the development of the rainforest led to conflict between different groups of people?

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Introduction

How has the development of the rainforest led to conflict between different groups of people? The rainforest is a tall dense jungle. The climate of the rainforest is very hot and humid so all animals and plants living there have adapted to these conditions. The reason that it is called a rainforest is because of the high amount of rainfall that it has each year. The rainforest covers on 6% of the earth's surface but contains over half the species of the plant and animal species. The rainforest can be found in: Central America: it used to be totally covered in rainforest but is now less because large areas have been cut down for cattle ranchers and sugar plantations. The Amazon: The Amazon is the world's largest tropical rainforest. It Even has the worlds second longest river (the Amazon) running through it. The Amazon is home to the greatest variety of plants and animals on Earth. A 1/5 of the entire world's plants and birds and about 1/5 of all mammal species are found there. This has been cut down due to logging mainly. ...read more.

Middle

National Debt: Selling logs and trees was seen of a way of helping nations to pay off their debts. Large Roads: for transport of goods like timber, food, gold and general travels. Giving Land: giving land to the peasant farmers for small business has led to big deforestation because there are so many of them. Cattle ranching; Cattle ranchers have burned away forest and replaced it with grass for there cattle to grass to make meat. They occupy 25%of the Amazon today. Mining: The Amazon forest is rich in minerals such as iron ore, bauxite, manganese, diamonds, silver and gold. Mining companies have cleared the forests, to build roads and railways through the forest. Hardwoods: there has been more of a demand for hard woods such as mahogany and ebony by economically developed countries there for it was cut down because Brazil needed the money. (http://www.zigzageducation.co.uk/synopses/1599-s.pdf)These are the main causes of deforestation and many of them would cause a war if tried to stop for many people need the money even though lots of people are getting it from illegal mines and logging companies. ...read more.

Conclusion

These aren't all of the views but you can already see the conflict between groups like the yanomami and cattle ranchers: the yanomami want a home but the cattle ranchers don't care and will just cut it all down, the environmentalists and the loggers: the environmentalists want the trees and for the loggers it is just their job, but also I think that some may get on like the yanomami and the Brazilian government: the both respect and understand each other.(www.wiki-answers.co.uk) We can sustainably manage the rainforest by, creating large parks where logging, mining e.c.t aren't allowed, By being able to clear cut, where you cut down a fairly large area of trees but replant all of them with other trees. Make an area for all the bad stuff e.g. cattle farming, logging. And an area for the tribes. I think that these are reasonable ideas and should be thought about. The deforestation is an important issue but I think that it will never be solved because there is always one selfish person and it is at a huge scale and to solve it we would need total world peace for the total world to agree. Anna Shortman 8f ...read more.

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Response to the question

The question is answered reasonably well: a good background on the rainforest is given, and both reasons and arguments against those reasons from each group is touched upon. The essay goes off topic and starts to take sides; making cattle ...

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Response to the question

The question is answered reasonably well: a good background on the rainforest is given, and both reasons and arguments against those reasons from each group is touched upon. The essay goes off topic and starts to take sides; making cattle ranchers appear evil.

Level of analysis

While the writer describes what's happening and various views are given, there is little in the way of explanation of these views. There is a lack of detail and the writer strays off topic towards the end – talking about 'world peace' and calling certain groups 'selfish' when this doesn't give an objective view of the situation.

Quality of writing

Spelling is fine, apart from the use of 'e.c.t.' when the writer meant 'etc.'. Some writing seems rushed with sentences not being fully fleshed out, and while the content is there it could be made easier to read.


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Reviewed by hassi94 28/03/2012

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