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Look Back in Anger was written by John Osborne, in 1956. The English stage company performed the play's first performance at The Royal Court theatre, on The 8th of May.

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Introduction

Plot - Look Back In Anger Look Back in Anger was written by John Osborne, in 1956. The English stage company performed the play's first performance at The Royal Court theatre, on The 8th of May. Within the play there were only five characters. The protagonist of the play was a man called Jimmy Porter, who was played by Kenneth Haigh. The other four characters consisted of Cliff Lewis, Alison Porter, Helena Charles and Alison's father, Colonel Redfern. John Osborne's play shows us a turning point in the life of Jimmy Porter, husband to Alison Porter and friend to Cliff Lewis. Throughout the play Jimmy expresses his anger and frustration in ways both verbal and physical. It is a "kitchen sink" drama, which shows realism and has language that everybody can understand, which shocked the contemporary audience. The play takes place in a one bedroom flat in the Midlands. Jimmy Porter is lower middle class. He lives with his wife Alison Porter, the daughter of Colonel Redfern. His friend Cliff Lewis, who helps Jimmy run a sweet stall, lives with them in Act one. Jimmy reads papers and taunts his friends over the acceptance of the world around them. ...read more.

Middle

In this scene I tried to show my emotions quite clearly. I was extremely angry with Jimmy and I showed this by gestures and facial expressions. The gestures I used were very clear hand movements such as, outstretching my arm when addressing Jimmy. I did this to make my self bigger and more superior to Jimmy. My facial expressions were very clear also; I would scrunch up my face in an angry manor, and try to make my face as stubborn as possible. I did this to try and make Jimmy believe I was serious, and he had gone too far. When Alison burns her arm, Jimmy leaves the room, leaving Cliff to be a shoulder to cry on for Alison. Then Alison tells Cliff (and the audience, by using cognitive access) that she is pregnant, this adds to the tension onstage. An offstage telephone call at the end of Act 1, tells us that another character, Helena Charles who is a friend of Alison's, is about to enter the flat. In Act II, Helena arrives. She is a threat to Jimmy, as she knows how to stand up to him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jimmy leaves the room and Alison and Helena are left to talk alone together. In act three scene two Alison and Helena sit down and have a cup of tea together. We then come to learn Alison's true feelings and thoughts through one of her few monologues. Alison doesn't really want to be at the flat. Alison: "Oh why am I here? You must all wish me a thousand miles away!" Helena: "I don't wish anything of the kind. You're more right to be here than I." Alison tells Helena that she has lost the baby. Alison is feeling rather guilty, she tells Alison she is leaving Jimmy, but she makes it quite clear that she is not stepping aside for Alison to go back to him. Helena leaves quite abruptly leaving just Alison and Jimmy in the flat. As Jimmy and Alison both make their long speeches at the end, the audience knows that they are both hurt and feel each others pain to their loss counting around the lost child. At the end of the play Alison and Jimmy return to using the metaphors of squirrels and bears giving us subtext that there is hope for the future. They have both suffered and through the loss of the child there might be some common ground for understanding. ...read more.

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