• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Pedestrian Counts.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE Geography Coursework Analysis 1. Pedestrian Counts My Isoline Map of Cambridge shows that, as I predicted, the overall trend of my data is that the further you move away from the city, the fewer the number of pedestrians. This theory is backed up by my scatter graph, which shows a negative correlation meaning that the pedestrian counts and the distance away from the city centre are inversely proportional, with lower counts the further you move away. The two innermost, red coloured zones of the map have pedestrian counts in the mid four hundreds. These counts are this high for a number of reasons. They are in the centre of Cambridge's CBD, and as a result are filled with high demand shops and services, and a large number of densely populated office blocks. ...read more.

Middle

If these readings had been taken at 11:30am on a Sunday then I believe that the results would have been very different. At point number 27 I would say that there is an anomalous result. A pedestrian count of only 90 here does not keep in with the 400+ trend, and though there are a few similar results around it, such as the 107 at point 28, I feel that this result is an anomaly. A possible explanation for this is that there are very few shops in that area, but I think that a more likely one is that the boys took the reading at a point which was not actually on the main road, but down a tiny side street. ...read more.

Conclusion

This Isoline map is similar to the Burgess Urban model, in the highest density of people are in the centre of the town. However, it also differs from it as the zones are clearly not circular, with no people being found on the river. 2. Tax Discs As you can see from my tax discs map, most (12 out of 20) of the cars I surveyed were registered in Cambridge. This fits my prediction, and the is obviously because the survey was carried out IN Cambridge, and therefore any residents surveyed were very likely to have their car registered at the placed they lived. In regard to the other 8 cars not registered in Cambridge, the ones registered in relatively far off places such as Kent and London and were most probably belonging to tourists who had come up to see Cambridge. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Human Geography section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

Overall 4 out of 5 stars.
This section of the report is well structured and shows the elements of description, explanation and examples in SOME parts of the analysis. There is also a link to geographical theory. However there is also more opportunity for extended explanation and analysis of some findings and to make links BETWEEN different sets of data, eg. the tourist attraction of the colleges and tax disc data.

Marked by teacher Katie Price 15/05/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Human Geography essays

  1. Investigating the Spheres of influence between two major shopping centres.

    Data Collection Preparation: Designing a questionnaire, a traffic count survey and a people count survey. 2) Data Collection - Visit both the Winton and Castlepoint shopping centres and carry out my collection. 3) Data Analysis - Make conclusions from my results.

  2. GCSE Geography Settlement Coursework

    would cost less and be available in more places. Someone travelling a further distance is looking for something specific, a high order good. The availability of these could be more limited, so it is clear that the greater distance travelled the more money spent. Hypothesis 5 - The Boots on Cornmarket Street, Oxford, will have a larger sphere of influence than the Boots on Banbury Road, Summertown.

  1. Geography Tourism Coursework

    3 This table shows the percent of staying visitors to the peak district and the different origins. Tourism Worldwide This graph shows the amount of tourists that travel to the UK and the amount that travel abroad. From the graph you can see that tourism abroad, has improved while tourism in the UK has improved it is still unsteady.

  2. The Regeneration of the London Docklands

    The new houses, which have been built, are not aimed by the local people the LDDC built them for incoming workers so the LDDC has improved the housing of the local people to a low extent. The LDDC to an extent has improved the shopping in the Docklands: The LDDC

  1. Analysis of sphere of influence in different shopping centres. Like Merry Hill and ...

    can use the information boards and sign posts to find out where different areas of the shopping centre are and it would also help enhance Kidderminster (Old)'s reputation. Apart from the above problems Kidderminster (Old) has a good environmental quality.

  2. Portobello Road Coursework.

    Figures 1 and 2: The location of Portobello Road. Figures 1 and 2 above show the location of Portobello Road. Portobello Road is located in the Royal borough of Kensington and Chelsea. At the north it adjoins with Wornington Road, towards the middle it passes under the Westway motorway, and towards the south the road ends at Pembridge Road.

  1. What impact has tourism had on the people and the environment of Jamaica?

    In effect there have been a number of cases of people suffering from diseases due to drinking contaminated water or eating contaminated seafood.

  2. 'Do people travel further to buy comparison goods rather than convenience goods?'

    And at the same time, the market may have extended the distance people are willing to travel for convenience goods. Even though the market is of mainly convenience goods, people may still be prepared to travel from fairly far to shop in the market.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work