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The Arguments For and Against Coastal Protection Schemes

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Introduction

The Arguments For and Against Coastal Protection Schemes The sea is constantly eroding the coastline. This destroys property, and people living nearby have reduced value on their houses. Natural beauty spots and walks are lost, reducing tourism in seaside towns. Solutions to this are coastal protection schemes that slow the waves down and delay the process of erosion on the cliffs. The arguments for sea defence schemes are as follows... Sea protection plans help to prevent further loss of economy caused by coastal erosion, for example; reduced property prices in 'at-risk' areas, less tourism due to destruction of tourist spots (which results in less money), and the replacement of important sites e.g.: industrial areas, ports and places of historical and geological interest would be expensive. ...read more.

Middle

Coastal defences create visual pollution, and ruin the natural atmosphere of the beach. Also, if they are poorly maintained, they may pose a hazard to swimmers and sunbathers. Methods of protecting the coast are: Sea wall. This is a barrier that reflects the waves and withstands storms, completely protecting the cliff. Although they effectively reduce erosion, they are costly at �6000 per metre, and spoil the natural view of the coast. Beach Re-building. The sand on a beach inhibits the sea from eroding the coast as much, by absorbing some energy from the waves as they hit the shore and slows them down as they go up the slope to the cliff. ...read more.

Conclusion

These cost �2000 per metre. Offshore breakwater. This is a small wall made of concrete or other interlocking material built out to sea, and positioned below the low water mark. It guards the coast from all waves, as they break on the breakwater instead of on the coast. These cost about �5000 per metre. Rip-rap. These are artificial interlocking boulders that defend the coast by breaking up the waves to minimise erosion. They cost �3500 per metre. Gabions. These are strong wire cages filled with stones. They act like a sea wall and look more natural as they slowly get covered with grass and sand. These cost �100 per metre. I think beach rebuilding is the best option because it is cheapest, natural, and protects the cliffs effectively. Emma-Jane Carvell 12/18/2007 ...read more.

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