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The Boscastle Flooding

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Introduction

The Boscastle Flooding Heavy storms on Monday 16th August 2004 hit the area of Boscastle and Crackington Haven in North Cornwall, causing 6cm (2ins) of rain to fall in two hours in the Boscastle area, see the radar image below. Accentuated by the steep-sided topography surrounding the Boscastle area, such high rainfall falling in such a short time could not be absorbed into the ground and a 3-metre high flood rushed through the village (travelling up to 40mph) The flash flood at Boscastle, north Cornwall, on Monday 16 August, was the consequence of a violent four-hour downpour over the small catchment of the Valency river. There was no obvious culprit: some newspapers suggested that Hurricane Bonny was responsible, others blamed global warming, but in truth there was no evident external influence on the meteorological events of that afternoon In this essay, I will be investigating why the Boscastle flood occurred (including the effects and responses) and how we can limit the damage that flooding causes. In this essay I will also be investigating alternative ways to carry on with everyday life and still be able to keep the rivers from flooding. IMAGES OF THE BOSCASTLE FLOODING What were the causes, effects the response of the Boscastle flood? ...read more.

Middle

A major rescue operation was launched by the RAF to airlift people to safety. Also, many people responded with the views on the Boscastle flood on the Internet (left). They expressed they sympathy towards the people who were affected by the flood and how the flood causes great inconvenience and distress for the tourists and the people who live there. They also put forward their opinion of what the causes of the flood were and how well the situation was handled. Lymouth, North Devon: 15th - 16th August 1952 Fifty years ago, almost to the day of the Boscastle flood, torrential rain caused flash flooding through a number of North Devon towns and villages (known as the Lynmouth Floods) and resulted in the death of 34 people. 15 cm (6 inches) of rain were recorded between the 1st and 14th August in a MET Office rain gauge at Longstone Barrow (Dartmoor) at the head of the West Lyn river. This unsettled weather followed a period of drought affecting most of Southern England. The catchment area of the Lyn rivers totals over 39 sq. miles, much of which is plateau drained by steep sided combes covered in parts by moorland grasses on wet, peaty ground and by heather and bracken in others. ...read more.

Conclusion

reduce flooding elsewhere and overcoming the problems of habitat loss through 'coastal squeeze' * Increasing storage capacity (by restoring the floodplain; upstream storage; modifying catchment run-off e.g. with the use of Sustainable Drainage Systems. * Structures (e.g. flood walls or embankments) * Increased conveyance (e.g. deepening and widening the channel to enable it to carry more water; adding flood relief channels) * River diversion * Land use changes Flood warning installation, maintenance or improvement Graphs on Flood Structure and Flood defences As can be seen in the graph and table below, the South West has a slightly below average number of defences in fair, good or very good condition (90% compared to the national average of 93.8%). Only the North East performed worse. Just 10% of all defences surveyed were in poor or very poor condition however, although this was below the national average of 6.1%). As can be seen in the graph and table below, the South West has the second lowest number of structures in fair, good or very good condition (90%, which is also slightly below the national average of 92.4%). Just 10% of all structures surveyed were in poor or very poor condition (although this is again below the national average of 7.5%). 1 ...read more.

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